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Shakespeare and Performance

updated: 
Friday, September 9, 2011 - 5:05pm
Early Modern Studies Journal (EMSJ) formally Early English Studies (EES)

The 2012 issue will focus on "Shakespeare and Performance." We are interested in articles that consider any aspect of performance in historical or contemporary productions of Shakespeare and his contemporary playwrights. The following list is of possible topics, but should not be considered exhaustive:

Registration now open: The Cultural Politics of Ageing in the Nineteenth Century - Interdisciplinary Perspectives

updated: 
Friday, September 9, 2011 - 4:50pm
Department of English and American Studies, University of Regensburg

The Cultural Politics of Ageing in the Nineteenth Century:
Interdisciplinary Perspectives

International Conference at the University of Regensburg, 24-26 November 2011

Conference Venue: Haus der Begegnung, Hinter dem Grieb 8, Regensburg (Germany)

Confirmed Speakers: David Amigoni, Katharina Boehm, Lynn Botelho, Karen Chase, Nigel Goose, Kay Heath, Inge Kroppenberg, Norbert Lennartz, Teresa Mangum, Gordon McMullan, Greta Olson, Jochen Petzold, Rebecca Probert, Helen Small, Brian Worsfold, Anne-Julia Zwierlein

Mindful Body in Healing and the Arts (9/24)

updated: 
Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 10:29pm
The Center for Body, Mind, and Culture at Florida Atlantic University

Mindful Body in Healing and the Arts

The Center for Body, Mind and Culture invites proposals for papers to be presented at a 2-day conference, January 19-20, 2011 at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton.

Regarding the body as sentient, purposive subjectivity (rather than mere physical flesh), the conference will focus on ways that somatic mindfulness can contribute to health, healing, and aesthetic experience. Papers dealing with disciplines of mindful body consciousness (Asian and Western) and their applications in the areas of wellness, fitness, and the arts are especially welcome.

[REMINDER] The Apocalypse in Literature and Film - October 1, 2011

updated: 
Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 2:15pm
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

[UPDATE] NEMLA: March 15-18, 2012, Rochester, NY: Call for papers - Obscenity, Violence, and Humor in the Eighteenth-Century Nov

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 3:50pm
Kathleen Alves/City University of New York

**Abstracts sent to the tamayok@stjohns.edu has been lost. Please resend immediately to the alternative emails above**

This panel will examine eighteenth-century British fiction and the relationship between violence, obscenity and humor. Novelists' use of the obscene joke is a tempered way to suppress the blurring lines of distinction between classes and to maintain hierarchy, a direct response to the changes in society and to the increasing sensitivity to vulgar subjects in polite society. This panel is interested in discovering how authors mobilize social anxiety through violence, obscenity and humor.

Call for Proposals: Sessions, Panels, Papers on SEA LITERATURE, HISTORY & CULTURE

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 12:41pm
Stephen Curley, Area Chair, Sea Literature, History & Culture , Popular Culture & American Culture Associations

Sessions are scheduled in 1½ hour slots, with four papers or speakers each. You may propose individual papers, special panels, or sessions organized around a theme.

Possible sea-related topics include, but are not limited to:
►Film, art, music, and television
►Historical events
►Creative writing
►Sea sagas from western & non-western cultures
►Recreation, technology, business

http://pcaaca.org/conference/national.php

NeMLA 2012: "Of Queen's Gardens": Victorian Ecofeminism

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 12:32pm
Margaret S. Kennedy

Call for Papers: "Of Queen's Gardens": Victorian Ecofeminism
This panel invites ecofeminist readings of Victorian literature
(novels, poetry, prose), wherein women are frequently given "natural" traits or are associated with the earth. Ecofeminist interpretations may highlight the damaging consequences of this link, or celebrate women's potential to reform cultural/environmental attitudes because of it. In what ways does the woman/nature link function in Victorian literature? What do these interpretations reveal about Victorian
attitudes about gender and the environment, and the treatment of each?
Please e-mail abstracts of 300-500 words to Margaret Kennedy,

Call for Papers for LGBTQ Focus Group (Deadline: October 15/November 1, 2011)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 12:28pm
Association for Theatre in Higher Education (Conference 2012)

CALL FOR PAPERS
LGBTQ Focus Group
Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) Conference
August 2-5, 2012, Hyatt Regency (Capitol Hill), Washington, DC

Submission Deadlines:
Individual Papers or Presentations: October 15 (send to conference planner Nick Salvato, ngs9@cornell.edu)
Complete Sessions: November 1 (submit online directly to ATHE at www.athe.org)

Capturing Witches: Histories, Stories, Images. 400 years after the Lancashire Witches

updated: 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 10:29am
Lancaster University, UK

In 2012, a year-long programme of events in Lancaster and the surrounding area will mark the 400th anniversary of the trial and execution of the first group of Lancashire Witches. A second trial occurred in 1634 and although pardoned, the accused were re-imprisoned in Lancaster Castle. The case of the Lancashire Witches and their supposed crimes interwove fact and fiction, local hostilities and more exotic ideas of witches' sabbats that were usually associated with continental witchcraft. They became a cause célèbre, like the witches of Trier and Fulda (Germany), Torsåker (Sweden) and Salem (North America).

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