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CFP: Drawing the Line(s): Censorship and Cultural Practices [Oct 31, 2011; March 1-3, 2012]

updated: 
Saturday, August 6, 2011 - 4:40am
Nhora Serrano, California State University, Long Beach

47th Annual Comparative Literature Conference
California State University, Long Beach
March 1st-3rd, 2012
Drawing the Line(s): Censorship and Cultural Practices

Plenary Speaker: Ilan Stavans
Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College

Special B-Word Public Lecture: An Evening with Azar Nafisi

"Freedom of speech means that you shall not do something to people either for the views they have, or the views they express, or the words they speak or write." ~ Hugo L. Black, U.S. Supreme Court Justice 1963

"There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches" ~ Ray Bradubury, Fahrenheit 451

[UPDATE] Revenge of the Queers: Ethics and the Politics of Resentment (NEMLA 2012)

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2011 - 3:41pm
Emily King / NEMLA 2012

From Diane DiMassa's caffeinated homicidal heroine in Hothead Paisan to Lee Edelman's sinthomosexual who "chooses not to choose the Child," revenge – if only phantasmatic – invigorates queer narratives, theory, even politics. And given that oppression breeds resentment, it is no intellectual leap to consider why revenge becomes a popular trope. But is there something inherently queer about revenge? Could we envision distinctly queer forms of revenge? Or is such an essentialist application of "queer" its very antithesis?

[UPDATE] The Apocalypse in Literature and Film - October 1, 2011

updated: 
Friday, August 5, 2011 - 9:21am
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

Language, Literature and Cultural Studies

updated: 
Thursday, August 4, 2011 - 4:55am
Military Technical Academy, Department of Foreign Languages, Bucharest

Language, literature and cultural studies
ISSN: 2065-3867

Call for papers
Deadline: 1 November 2011 for LLCS no.8 and no.9

http://www.mta.ro

The Department of Foreign Languages of the Military Technical Academy invites you to contribute to the seventh and eighth numbers of the Journal of Language, Literature and Cultural Studies.

LLCS publishes research articles and reviews in the following domains: literature, literature and civilisation, comparative literature and civilization, cultural studies, linguistics, applied linguistics, translation studies, foreign language acquisition, foreign language teaching.

Wilkie Collins Journal - New Series

updated: 
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 - 11:41am
University of Reading, UK

The _Wilkie Collins Society Journal_ will be re-launched as a new online journal entitled _The Wilkie Collins Journal_ later this year. The publication will continue to be peer-reviewed and will be a rigorous academic resource.

We are currently looking for articles to feature in the first edition of the new, third series. The editor invites articles of between 6,000 and 8,000 words on any subject relating to the life and work of Wilkie Collins and/or related fiction. All manuscripts should follow the MLA Style and should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Email submissions are accepted: a.s.mangham@reading.ac.uk

Call for Volunteers: Dickens Journals Online

updated: 
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 - 7:30am
University of Buckingham

In six months' time, Britain will celebrate the bicentenary of arguably its greatest writer after Shakespeare, Charles Dickens (born 7th February 1812).

A huge swathe of Dickens's work as a writer, reporter, and magazine editor is embodied in the two weekly journals he edited for over twenty years, and in which he published hundreds of articles as well as some of his best known (and most widely studied) serial novels: Hard Times, A Tale of Two Cities, and Great Expectations. The rest of the contents – which were published anonymously – he helped commission, plan and meticulously copy-edit, from offices in Wellington Street, Covent Garden. A blue plaque opposite the Lyceum Theatre commemorates the spot.

Issues of Mobility and Confinement in Women's Literature (NeMLA 2012 Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2011 - 4:45pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

43nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 15-18, 2012
Rochester, New York – Hyatt Rochester
Host Institution: St. John Fisher College
Keynote speaker: Jennifer Egan, 2011 Pulitzer Prize winner, A Visit from the Goon Squad

Call for Book Reviewers

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2011 - 7:22am
American, British and Canadian Studies Journal

Call for Book Reviewers

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