Subscribe to RSS - victorian

victorian

'States of Emergency, States of Emergence?'

updated: 
Wednesday, June 15, 2011 - 12:25pm
Excursions Journal, University of Sussex

Excursions Journal

Call For Papers

'States of Emergence, States of Emergency'

Deadline for articles: 15th August 2011

Submit online at: http://www.excursions-journal.org.uk/cfp.html

'The tradition of the oppressed teaches us that the 'state of emergency' in which we live is not the exception but the rule. We must attain to a conception of history which is in keeping with this insight. Then we shall clearly realize that it is our task to bring about a real state of emergency, and this will improve our position in the struggle against fascism.'

[UPDATE] Conference on the Literary Essay from Montaigne to the Present

updated: 
Wednesday, June 15, 2011 - 10:42am
Queen Mary, University of London

Conference on the Literary Essay, London, July 2-3
Speakers: Adam Phillips, Geoff Dyer, Gillian Beer, Andrew O'Hagan,
Hermione Lee, Karl Miller, Jeremy Treglown, Ophelia Field,
Markman Ellis, Peter Howarth, Ophelia Field, Felicity James, Uttara Natarajan, Stefano Evangelista, Adam Piette, Kathryn Murphy, and Sophie Butler.

Subjects include Montaigne, Bacon, Addison and Steele, Hazlitt, Lamb, Carlyle, Macaulay, Pater, Stevenson, Woolf, the Cold War Essay.

Tickets and details available at:

http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/news/literaryessay/

CFP: Dickens and the Visual Imagination 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 - 10:50am
University of Surrey and the Paul Mellon Centre

An international two-day conference to celebrate the bicentenary of Charles Dickens in 2012
9-10 July 2012
This conference, hosted by the Paul Mellon Centre in London and the University of Surrey in Guildford, will explore the interfaces between art history and textual scholarship through the work of Charles Dickens.

Plenary speaker: Professor Kate Flint (Rutgers University). Other speakers to be confirmed.

Call for contributions to essay collection: Children's series books and internationalism

updated: 
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 - 10:35am
Marietta Frank, U Pitt-Bradford, and Karen Sands-O'Connor, Buffalo State College

The editors are currently seeking proposals for a collection of essays investigating internationalism in children's series books. With the tenth anniversary of the World Trade Center bombings, the "Arab Spring," and the increasing demands of non-Western countries for a voice in global politics, this is a particularly pertinent moment to examine how literature for children faces the challenges and possibilities of global interaction. Series books, with their reliance on the comfort of the familiar blended with the lure of adventure, frequently use the foreign and/or international setting as moral proving ground for the characters.

Transatlantic Gender-Crossings: Masquerade, Transvestitisms & the Carnivalesque / NeMLA, March 15-18, 2012, Rochester, NY

updated: 
Tuesday, June 14, 2011 - 9:14am
Anita Duneer / Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

This panel seeks papers on gender-crossings in fiction and drama by authors on both sides of the Atlantic. Topics might include a variety of literary and performative crossings, which transgress and re-imagine gender roles, or challenge the notion of discrete binaries of gender and sexuality. Of particular interest are papers that explore the ways in which literary masquerades, transvestitisms, and carnivalesque versions of gender or sexual identity intersect with issues of race, class, and national identity.

DS7

updated: 
Monday, June 13, 2011 - 1:33pm
[tba]

.
.
.
Initial invitations were sent for DS7 around May/June 2011.
Please politely ask around; closefriends, closecolleagues.

A call for entries to be made (more) public sometime
late this year or 2012.

You may send for your entry and grants now.

Thank you for your future time. Sincerely,

Mr. Ace,
artist, writer
.
.
.

UpStage: A Journal of Turn-of-the-Century Theatre

updated: 
Monday, June 13, 2011 - 10:54am
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, St. Mary's University College

UPSTAGE (http://www.oscholars.com/Upstage/uhome.htm),
a peer-reviewed, open-source online journal, published by Rivendale Press, U.K. and dedicated to research in turn-of-the-century dramatic literature, theatre, and theatrical culture, seeks submissions year-round. This is a development of the pages published under this name as part of THE OSCHOLARS, and is now an independently edited journal in the Oscholars group published at www.oscholars.com, as part of our expanding coverage of the different cultural manifestations of the fin de siècle.

POETIC AND POLITICS OF PLACE IN PASTORAL (MARCH 29-31)

updated: 
Monday, June 13, 2011 - 5:47am
University of Orléans, FRANCE, Faculté des Lettres, langues et sciences humaines

POETIC AND POLITICS OF PLACE IN PASTORAL

International Conference, Université d'Orléans (FRANCE), March 29-31, 2012

(Co-sponsors: REMELICE, Université d'Orléans, and FORELL, Université de Poitiers)

"Historically, pastoral has sometimes activated green consciousness, sometimes euphemized land appropriation. It may direct us toward the realm of physical nature, or it may abstract us from it" (Lawrence Buell. The Environmental Imagination: Thoreau, Nature Writing, and the Formation of American Culture).

"Pastoral's ancient and universal appeal – to come away – requires new examination in an age in which there is no away" (Glen A. Love. Practical Ecocriticism: Literature, Biology, and the Environment).

Fixing Foods in Literary Modernity: 2012 NeMLA (March 15-18)

updated: 
Saturday, June 11, 2011 - 5:15pm
Michael D Becker

Call for Papers: Fixing Foods in Literary Modernity

Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 15-18, 2012--Rochester, New York

For better and for worse, modernity has surely left its mark on the food we daily eat. Two hundred years ago in 1812, Bryan Donkin purchased from a London broker the patent for canning food items inside tin containers. Within the next decade canned goods were widespread in Britain and France (Robertson 123). One hundred and fifty years ago in the spring of 1862, Louis Pasteur and Claude Bernard's experiments with heating liquids eventually led to pasteurized drinks—first wine and beer and then, later, milk (Greene, Guzel-Seydim, and Seydim 88).

Pages