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Negative Cosmopolitanisms: Abjection, Power, and Biopolitics, 11-13 October 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, July 27, 2011 - 1:57pm
Terri Tomsky, Eddy Kent, Imre Szeman (Organzers). The Department of English and Film Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

This interdisciplinary conference seeks to explore the array of negative cosmopolitanisms operating today—all those ways in which cosmopolitan subjects are still stigmatized, disempowered, excluded, and denied. Against the superficial liberal celebration of cosmopolitan diversity in the world today, negative cosmopolitanism instead reveals experiences of rupture, exile, oppression, and imperialism. The conference will bring researchers together to explore the histories and constitution of cosmopolitanism past and present, with the aim of better understanding the complex experience of power today.

2nd Global Conference: Urban Popcultures

updated: 
Wednesday, July 27, 2011 - 6:12am
Dr Rob Fisher/ Inter-Discipinary.Net

2nd Global Conference
Urban Popcultures

Friday 9th March- Sunday 11th March 2012
Prague, Czech Republic

Call for Papers:
This inter- and multi-disciplinary conference aims to examine, explore
and critically engage with issues related to urban life. The project
will promote the ongoing analysis of the varied creative trends and
alternative cultural movements that comprise urban popultures and
subcultures. In particular the conference will encourage equally
theoretical and practical debates which surround the cultural and
political contexts within which alternative urban subcultures are
flourishing.

UPDATE: Performing South Asia at Home and Abroad, SALA 2012

updated: 
Monday, July 25, 2011 - 6:08pm
South Asian Literary Association

Performing South Asia at Home and Abroad

South Asian Literary Association (SALA), Seattle 2012

Date: Wed., January 4, 2012 at 9:00am – Thurs., January 5, 2012 at 5:00pm

Venue: Hyatt Place Downtown, 110 6th Avenue North (at Denny Way)

Distinguished Keynote Speaker: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak

Distinguished Guest Author: Charles Johnson

Abstract Deadline: August 31, 2011

[UPDATE] Rural Geographies of Gender and Space, Britain 1840-1920 - CFP DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Monday, July 25, 2011 - 6:33am
University of Warwick

Rural Geographies of Gender and Space, Britain 1840-1920

23rd September 2011, University of Warwick

*CFP DEADLINE EXTENDED– 15th August*

Whilst discussions of gender and space in the nineteenth-to early-twentieth century have typically focused on "women and the city", rural spaces offer equally productive contexts for exploring the intersections between gender and space in this period. As the socio-spatial relations of the country are impacted by the move into modernity, rural environments are revealed in literary and historical texts as sites of complex, contradictory and changing gendered codes.

Filolog - journal for literary, cultural and language studies (September 30)

updated: 
Sunday, July 24, 2011 - 4:48am
University of Banja Luka

Filolog (Philologist) is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal with an international Editorial Board.

We are calling for papers dealing with contemporary literary, cultural, and language theories and/or their applications to particular works for the third issue of our journal. We would also welcome papers dealing with meta-theories and their significance for the human and social sciences, as well as reviews of the most recent books in the field of cultural, language and literary theories and criticism.

Papers should be a maximum of 10.000 words, and use the New Harvard Citation System. Papers must include abstracts and key words. Authors should also provide a short bio (up to 20 lines).

[UPDATE] CFP: The Apocalypse in Literature and Film (October 1, 2011)

updated: 
Friday, July 22, 2011 - 8:18am
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

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