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Women and Work: Special Session, MLA, Seattle, WA, Jan 5-8, 2012

Wednesday, February 16, 2011 - 4:01pm
Modern Language Association

How do writers represent women's work, where "work" is defined broadly to encompass not only paid labor inside and outside the home, but also the work of performing femininity and domesticity? How do writers address social assumptions about who should be performing work, and for what purpose?

The deadline for submitting proposals to this special session is March 15, 2011. Please note that this session is provisional, pending approval by the MLA Special Sessions committee, which will consider submitted panels in May and inform presiding officers in early June. However, to be listed in the conference program, one must be a member of MLA by April 7, 2011.

The 2011 Trollope Prize

Wednesday, February 16, 2011 - 12:40pm
The University of Kansas

It is with great pleasure that we announce the 2011 Trollope Prize, sponsored by the English Department and the Hall Center for the Humanities at the University of Kansas.

Qualities of Heroism, 5 November 2011 at Corpus Christi College, Oxford

Wednesday, February 16, 2011 - 7:33am
Christian Literary Studies Group Dr Roger Kojecky

CfP deadline 31 May 2011
Strength, virtue and bravery have long characterised the subjects of narrative. If protagonists surmount threats, or survive danger, we are inclined to ascribe the triumph to their heroism. When stories veer into realism, antiheroes receive the attention formerly reserved for gods and heroes.
The gospels are an enquiry into the heroism of their subject. Their opening unstated question is whether there was anything heroic in one who walked open-eyed into an avoidable death? Soon resurrection and a new interpretation of Jesus' heroism was found, and it was seen that he fulfilled a hidden paradigm, Messiahship. A succession of martyrs would bear witness to the same interpretation.

Folia linguistica et litteraria - scientific journal for language and literature studies

Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - 1:34pm
University of Montenegro

Folia linguistica et litteraria is a scientific journal for language and literature studies, founded at the Faculty of Philosophy, Nikšić, University of Montenegro in 2010.
This is a peer-reviewed journal with an international board of editors.
Folia linguistica et litteraria's mission is promotion of excellence in the fields of linguistics and literature, through original scientific research, as well as reviews and translations of theoretical works.
The submission deadline for the third issue of the journal is April 15, 2011.
Papers should meet the requirements of the MLA Citation Style and should not exceed 7000 words. Papers must include abstracts and key words in author's native language.

[UPDATE] Fin-de-Siecle Pedagogies; MLA, Seattle, WA, January 5-8, 2012

Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - 10:26am
Helena Gurfinkel, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Topics may include, but are not limited to: the dissemination of sexual "knowledge," lecture tours, public health education, schools & universities, homoeroticism and pedagogy, education & the New Woman, teaching the fin de siècle today. Not limited to Anglophone literature and culture. Abstract of 300 words and brief C.V. by March 10; Helena Gurfinkel (

This special session is subject to approval by the MLA; participants must be MLA members by April 7th, 2011.

Sensation, Reason, ImaginationGothic Evolutions, 28th-30th October 2011

Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - 5:10am
Andrew McInnes, University of Exeter

This conference pursues two linked aims: first, to explore the Gothic's relationship with science – fact, fiction and fantasy – especially its fascination with the cognitive, psychological and biological underpinnings of sensation, reason and imagination; and second, to trace the evolution of the Gothic genre itself through history, architecture, literature, film, television and popular culture. We welcome the submission of 250 word abstracts for 20 minute papers that may address, but not be limited by, the following topics: the Gothic and science; the Gothic through history; the Gothic and literary theory; male, female and queer Gothics; Gothic fashions; goth culture; twenty-first century Gothic; the future of the Gothic.

Challenging Political Economy: Interdisciplinary Approaches

Monday, February 14, 2011 - 9:59pm
Dr Lesa Scholl/Emmanuel College, University of Queensland

Challenging Political Economy: Interdisciplinary Approaches
Emmanuel College within the University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, 8-9 December 2011
Keynote Speakers
Frank Stilwell (University of Sydney, Australia)
Ella Dzelzainis (University of Newcastle, UK)
Since its inception in the late eighteenth century, Political Economy has been used as a lens through which to examine and address parochial and international social issues, from gender equality to class, abolitionism, environmental concerns, imperialism and globalisation. Throughout history, the response to Political Economy has often been controversial, from popularising and translating economic texts, to burning and banning them.

France in Dickens (MLA 2012, Jan 5-8)

Monday, February 14, 2011 - 6:18pm
Rebecca Stern

France in Dickens
Creating and breaking stereotypes about French language, literature, culture, history, and taste (culinary and otherwise) in Dickens's writings. 300-word abstracts and short CV by March 10 to Rebecca Stern ( [Note: this panel is in partnership with the Division on Nineteenth-Century French Literature].

Dickensian Beginnings (MLA 2012, Jan 5-8)

Monday, February 14, 2011 - 6:17pm
Kate E. Brown

A panel sponsored by the Dickens Society.
Dickensian Beginnings
Disruptions and reoriginations of sequential narrative in Dickens's writings:  e.g., birth, revolution, climactic events, coronations or regicide, new technologies.  Please email a 300-word abstract and short CV by March 15 to Kate Brown (