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Victorian Medievalisms: Speculum Societatis—A Mirror for Society

updated: 
Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 9:56am
Bemidji State University

The Victorian Age in many ways looked back to the medieval period as a time that was more stable, that embodied ideals to be emulated in the modern world, for examples of sound leadership, orthodox belief and faith, and divinely ordained social structures. These medievalisms took many forms, including Alfredian celebrations, interest in Arthurian romances, neo-Gothic architecture, reforms in the Church, Pre-Raphaelite paintings of knights and ladies, and Count Dracula. The medieval in all its forms was shaped into a mirror by which the Victorians both escaped their own world but also harnessed the old to help form the new world of the 19th century.

RUINs in Twentieth-Century British Art and Fiction

updated: 
Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 5:46am
Society for Twentieth Century British Studies and the Society for Intersemiotic Text/Image Studies

As opposed to the Gothic labyrinths of vaults and broken palaces or shattered abbeys, in the nineteenth century the picturesque legacy grew into a passion for sublime ruins as crystals of time, suffused with melancholy pleasure. From Romantic hubris (and the fascination for Troy or Pompei) to Turner's luminous visions or Hardy's carved windows and stone coffins, ruins offered dwindling points of aesthetic stability as well as symptoms of mutability in a changing world stamped by Darwinian ruthlessness.

Victorian Medievalisms: Speculum Societatis—A Mirror for Society

updated: 
Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 2:18pm
BemidjiState University British Studies

The Victorian Age in many ways looked back to the medieval period as a time that was more stable, that embodied ideals to be emulated in the modern world, for examples of sound leadership, orthodox belief and faith, and divinely ordained social structures. These medievalisms took many forms, including Alfredian celebrations, interest in Arthurian romances, neo-Gothic architecture, reforms in the Church, Pre-Raphaelite paintings of knights and ladies, and Count Dracula. The medieval in all its forms was shaped into a mirror by which the Victorians both escaped their own world but also harnessed the old to help form the new world of the 19th century.

Literature, Faith, and Metamorphosis: Transformative Journeys

updated: 
Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 12:50pm
2011 West Regional Conference on Christianity & Literature, Vanguard University of Southern California

http://vanguardccl.wordpress.com/
Proposals for scholarly or creative panels, interdisciplinary sessions, round tables, or individual fifteen to twenty-minute presentations on the interface between literary studies and Christianity. Special consideration will be given to papers relating to the conference theme, "transformative journeys."

CFP: Fear, Horror and Terror 5 (September, 2011; Oxford, United Kingdom)

updated: 
Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 7:09am
Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Net

5th Global Conference
Fear, Horror and Terror

Tuesday 6th September 2011 – Thursday 8th September 2011
Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom

This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference seeks to examine and explore issues which lie at the interface of fear, horror and terror. In particular the project is interested in investigating the various contexts of fear, horror and terror, and assessing issues surrounding the artistic, cinematic, literary, moral, social, (geo) political, philosophical, psychological and religious significance of them, both individually and together.

Literature and Religion, PAMLA 11/ 5-11/6, 2011, proposal deadline, 3/15 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 5:07pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, Scripps College, Claremont, CA 11/5-11/6, 2011

The Literature and Religion panel at 2011 PAMLA Conference seeks papers that address how questions of faith have shaped literary works and cultural meanings. In particular, it welcomes papers exploring the relationship between suffering and religious identity. Some of the questions we will consider are: how do writers represent the connection between suffering and faith? Can certain experiences of epiphany—i.e. moments of empathic identification with the suffering other—be categorized as inherently transcendent? Do religious and non-religious writers come to terms with human suffering in different ways?

Please submit proposals by 3/15 2011
Email: hapark1@gmail.com

States of Crime: The State in Crime Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 7:59am
Queen's University Belfast

States of Crime: The State in Crime Fiction

17th-18th of June 2011, Queen's University, Belfast.

Call for papers/ Appel à contribution

Deadline/ Date limite: 28th February 2011

Keynote speaker: Professor Dominique Kalifa, Université Paris 1 Panthéon - Sorbonne

Guest Writers: Eoin McNamee, David Peace

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