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RMMLA English Nineteenth-Century Literature

updated: 
Thursday, March 22, 2018 - 10:20am
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, April 1, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS 2018

ENGLISH NINETEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE SESSION

Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association

Conference Dates: October 4-6, 2018

Cheyenne, WY

 

Participants for "Narratives of Property in British History" NACBS Panel

updated: 
Thursday, March 22, 2018 - 9:16am
Agnes Burt, Phd Candidate, Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, March 27, 2018

 

 

Historians have long recognized the central relationship between property ownership and political participation in Britain. As many have acknowledged, throughout the nineteenth century, men’s ability to vote was based on fulfilling a property qualification; even women’s enfranchisement in 1918 still carried property requirements.

Colonialism and its Narratives

updated: 
Monday, March 19, 2018 - 8:58am
Australian Centre, University of Melbourne
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 6, 2018

Colonialism and its Narratives: rethinking the colonial archive in Australia

The Australian Centre, University of Melbourne: 10-11 December 2018

Call for papers

The Review of English Studies Essay Prize

updated: 
Monday, March 19, 2018 - 9:20am
The Review of English Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 29, 2018

The Review of English Studies is now inviting entries for its 2018 Essay Prize. The RES Essay Prize aims to encourage scholarship amongst postgraduate research students in Britain and abroad. The essay can be on any topic of English literature or the English language from the earliest period to the present. 

The winner will receive:

  • Publication of the winning essay in the June 2019 issue of The Review of English Studies
  • £500 worth of OUP books
  • A free year's subscription to The Review of English Studies

Other entries of sufficient quality will also be considered for publication in RES.

Women and Work in Literature

updated: 
Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 9:09am
Susanne Weil/Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association (PAMLA, the west coast regional division of the Modern Language Association)

Special Session:  Women and Work in Literature

Chairs:  Susanne Weil, Centralia College; Christine Mower, Seattle University

CALL FOR PAPERS 2018 MMLA CONVENTION “CONSUMING CULTURES” ENGLISH II: ENGLISH LITERATURE 1800-1900

updated: 
Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - 4:55pm
Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 5, 2018

In keeping with this year’s MMLA theme, “Consuming Cultures,” I welcome papers that address issues of consumption in nineteenth-century British literature and culture. Possible topics include, but are certainly not limited to: print culture and readership; leisure activities; studies in food, medicine, plants, agriculture, and animals; consumption vs. production; consuming identities and bodies; and the intersections between postcolonialism, imperialism, and capitalism. Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief bio. by April 5th, 2018 to Bailey Shaw at bshaw@siu.edu

Call for Papers for the 65th Annual Meeting of the Midwest Conference on British Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - 9:08am
The Midwest Conference on British Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, April 15, 2018

The Midwest Conference on British Studies is proud to announce that its 65th Annual Meeting will be hosted by the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY, September 14-16, 2018. The keynote speaker will be Carolyn Malone of Ball State University, and the plenary address will be given by Matthew Giancarlo of the University of Kentucky.

 

My Victorian Novel: an edited collection

updated: 
Sunday, April 1, 2018 - 9:20pm
Annette R. Federico
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 1, 2018

 My Victorian Novel

Isobel Armstrong has lamented that the way we teach the Victorian novel, with enthusiasm and delight, is so different from the way we criticize it. I wonder if this is also partially true about the way we really read and experience Victorian novels, if there is a Wemmick-like division between the absorbed and happy reader, cozy and contented in the Castle, and the buttoned-up professor at the lectern or the laptop. Rereading Victorian fiction over time, for our classes or our scholarship, must at some level involve a relaxation of feeling, the evocation of memories, psychic immersion, and moral engagement––alongside critical distance, objectivity, or suspicion. 

Literary Fantasy and its Discontents

updated: 
Friday, April 13, 2018 - 2:38am
Taipei Tech (National Taipei University of Technology)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 31, 2018

In her still influential Fantasy and Mimesis: Responses to Reality in Western Literature (1984), Kathryn Hume defines the literary fantastic as any departure from consensus reality, believing that it holds an equally significant position in literary history as mimesis. Rather than being a recent and sometimes academically marginalized genre, fantasy, for Hume, is integral to almost all literature.

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