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Queering Neo-Victorianism Beyond Sarah Waters

updated: 
Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 10:39am
Special Issue of Neo-Victorian Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

Since the lesbian publishing sensation of the first of Sarah Waters’s trio of neo-Victorian novels, Tipping the Velvet (1998), nineteenth-century queerness has become an increasingly prominent trope across neo-Victorian media and criticism. On the one hand, neo-Victorian queerness functions as a means of recovering marginalised viewpoints and obscured histories, predominantly, though not exclusively, from the LGBTQI+ community. On the other hand, it serves as a strategic tool to negotiate both alliances and tensions between lesbianism and feminism, queer studies and gender theory, or gender-specific and queer-generic positionalities.

Humour and Satire in British Romanticism

updated: 
Sunday, May 12, 2019 - 2:32pm
Newcastle University and Durham University, UK
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 20, 2019

Humour and Satire in British Romanticism - Hatfield College, Durham University, UK - 13-14 September 2019

This two-day conference will explore the role of humour and satire in the Romantic period (as well as its influences and legacies in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries), focusing on everything from literary and graphic satire, to scientific conceptions of humour, to witty table talk.

Narratives of Ageing in the Nineteenth Century

updated: 
Tuesday, April 9, 2019 - 9:55am
Dr Alice Crossley / University of Lincoln, UK
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Narratives of Ageing in the Nineteenth CenturyUniversity of Lincoln, 23rd July 2019 Organisers: Dr Alice Crossley, Dr Amy Culley, and Dr Rebecca Styler Plenary Speaker: Prof. Devoney Looser, Arizona State University'Ageing in Public: Women Authors in the Nineteenth Century’  

This conference responds to the burgeoning critical interest of humanities scholars in age, ageing, and stages of life from childhood to old age in the nineteenth century.

The figure of the child and the imaginative investment in the idea of childhood are the focus of seminal studies of ageing in this period.

A Dissident Kingsley: The Life and Work of Lucas Malet. 15 June 2019

updated: 
Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 11:07am
Charles Kingsley 200 Festival
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 3, 2019

This is a call for abstracts of short papers (ca. 3,000 words) on the work of Lucas Malet to be presented at a summer symposium in Eversley, Hampshire. Organised in conjunction with the CK200 Festival (https://ck200.live), celebrating the bicentennial of the author’s father Charles Kingsley, this symposium provides students and scholars opportunity to discuss recent research on Malet’s work.

Genre Bending: Crime's Hybrid Forms (theme issue of Clues: A Journal of Detection)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 11:22am
Elizabeth Foxwell / Clues: A Journal of Detection
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Guest Editor: Maurizio Ascari (University of Bologna)

Throughout its long history, crime writing has inspired and been inspired by other genres such as the gothic, sensation fiction, horror, romance, film noir, science fiction, and true crime. This theme issue of Clues, guest edited by Maurizio Ascari, seeks to explore the richness of these generic contact zones and the acts of cross-pollination they engendered, ultimately contributing to the overall development of this galaxy of literary forms. Articles for this issue might address questions such as the following:

Happiness: Enlightenment to Present

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 1:42pm
University of Cambridge
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Happiness: Enlightenment to PresentKing’s College, CambridgeSaturday, October 19 – Sunday, October 20, 2019 

The question of what makes us happy, let alone how to actually define happiness, has preoccupied writers and philosophers since the Ancient Greeks. Happiness has often been viewed with suspicion; be it located in another world, aligned with worldly dangers, or pictured as an endless pursuit symptomizing our fall from grace. From the Enlightenment onwards, however, writers begin to reinvent or reinvigorate the idea of happiness in new forms. Rather than scold ourselves out of expectation, happiness is viewed as a component of real quotidian life, as something we might learn to expect from our encounters with reality.

Gaskell Journal Graduate Essay Prize

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 4:44pm
Gaskell Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, February 1, 2020

The Gaskell Journal

Joan Leach Memorial Graduate Student Essay Prize 2020

Deadline for submissions: 1st February 2020

 

The Gaskell Journal runs a biennial Graduate Student Essay Prize in honour of Joan Leach MBE, founder of the Gaskell Society.

[UPDATE] Journal of Dracula Studies

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 1:41pm
Transylvanian Society of Dracula/Anne DeLong
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

We invite manuscripts of scholarly articles (4000-6000 words) on any of the following: Bram Stoker, the novel Dracula, the historical Dracula, the vampire in folklore, fiction, film, popular culture, and related topics.

Submissions should be sent electronically (as an e-mail attachment in .doc or .rtf). Please indicate the title of your submission in the subject line of your e-mail. Send electronic submissions to journalofdraculastudies@kutztown.edu.

Special Issue of Humanities: Realism and Naturalism in the Humanities

updated: 
Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 1:35pm
Humanities: a peer-reviewed open access journal
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 30, 2019

Special Issue of Humanities: Realism and Naturalism in the Humanities

Guest Editor: Cameron Dodworth, Ph.D., Department of English, Methodist University

Deadline for Submissions: 30 June 2019

CFP--book collection, "Wilde Politics"

updated: 
Thursday, March 28, 2019 - 2:02pm
Michael Y. Bennett, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019

I have spoken with an Senior Commissioning Editor at Manchester University Press (with their strengths in theatre, nineteenth century lit, and politics), and he is very excited about the prospects of this edited collection. He/MUP is eagerly awaiting a proposal.

The book is called, Wilde Politics: The Political Thought of Oscar Wilde. My Introduction is (currently) entitled, “The Politics of Being Oscar Wilde.” The three sections of the book are “Victorian Politics”; “The Politics of Aesthetics”; and “Political Philosophy.” 

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