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world literatures and indigenous studies

ACLA 2020: Literary Diagnosis and the Anti-Medical Humanities

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 9:46pm
Melanie Jones / UCLA (ACLA Panel)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019

UPDATE: Work on international and/or non-English authors especially welcome!!

With Health Humanities programs on the rise and medical memoirs flooding our bookshelves, it is easy to forget that the alliances forged between literary representation and medical discourse are new and fragile. Writers from a multitude of traditions have frequently squared off against doctors for the right to diagnostic prominence, particularly in capturing the "essence" of disease and the dis-eased body/mind. Their motivations, meanwhile, have spanned from the starkly political to the intensely personal.

Transculturalism, Cultural Hybridity and Globalization

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 4:13pm
San Jose State University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Transculturalism, Cultural Hybridity and Globalization

     

Dr. Michiko Uryu    San Jose State University

Dr. Chunhui Peng       San Jose State University

 

ACLA 2020 Seminar: Geopolitical Narrative and the Genre Turn

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 4:12pm
Elijah Guerra and Cynthia Snider (U of Missouri--Columbia)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

The genre turn in global literature has inspired scholarship exploring the relationship between generic form and contemporary themes. In addition to Caren Irr’s Toward the Geopolitical Novel (2014), which investigates the newly emerging genre of the international political novel, and Theodore Martin’s Contemporary Drift (2017), a comprehensive analysis of contemporary genre fiction and filmwe have also seen scholarship tracking specific genre forms: Contemporary Literature’s 2006 special issue, Immigrant Fictions; Jeremy Rosen’s 2018 article “Literary Fictions and the Genres of Genre Fiction” in Post45; and Sheri-Marie Harrison’s 2019 series Global Horror in Post45, to name a few.

ACLA 2020 Call for Papers: Censorship and Dissent in South Asia

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 3:06pm
Preeti Singh/Ohio State University-Columbus
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

The history of censorship in modern South Asia goes back to the Registration of Books Act (1867), used to track anti-state sedition; and to the various indigenous and British non-governmental associations of civilians who organized themselves as the guardians of literary culture around the same time. Both these currents continue to the contemporary moment in many ways. Genres of dissent are governed by various acts, laws, associations, extra-judicial modes of repression, and more recently, by social media.

Translation as Material Practice: Case Studies in Production, Circulation, and Reception (ACLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 3:05pm
Whitney DeVos/University of California, Santa Cruz
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Call for Abstracts

ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association) 2020

Conference Dates: March 19th-22nd 2020, Chicago

Abstract submission deadline: Sept 23, 2019 (9 a.m. EST)


 

"Translation as Material Practice: Case Studies in Production, Circulation, and Reception"

https://www.acla.org/translation-material-practice-case-studies-production-circulation-and-reception

 

Environmental Hazards and Migrations

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 2:00pm
JAm It! Journal of American Studies in Italy
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

The third issue of JAm It! (Journal of American Studies in Italy) will explore the relations between environmental transformations and migrations in the North American context from a multi-disciplinary perspective. While scholarship in American Studies has produced relevant contributions analyzing the historical and present contingencies of both endogenous and exogenous migratory flows, the complex relations between migrations and ecological change require further inquiry within the field.

Reminder: Unrealized Futures: Post-Socialist Memory in German-language Literature

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 1:59pm
(NeMLA March 5-8, 2020, Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

For this panel, we invite contributions on literary explorations of the socialist legacy in Eastern Europe in its relation to the present and the future. Much of the post-1989 scholarship has focused on Aufarbeitung broadly defined as a crucial trait of literature from and about the former East. More recently, some scholars have brought into view another dimension of literary engagement with Eastern Europe’s past: an engagement with the hopes and dreams that never came to fruition and the unrealized, alternative futures embedded in the socialist past.

Global Horror: Local Perspectives

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 1:37pm
Progressive Connexions
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 8, 2019

Horror pervades human experience. It affects us both as individuals and as members of social communities, it is recurrent in pop culture and arguably present in all fields of human knowledge and realms of storytelling, from Cronus eating his own children, to Freddy Krueger’s sadistic murders in A Nightmare on Elm Street to media coverage of war. As a fundamentally paradoxical concept, horror simultaneously repels and fascinates us: we naturally dread it, yet we are drawn to it. We are taught to avoid that which is horrifying, but the appeal of horror, whether in the form of fiction or sensational news, is irresistible.

[ACLA] The Other of Postcolonial Studies: Postcolonial Islands, Their Unique Sensbility and Challenges

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2019 - 2:13pm
Nick Lu, Maricruz Gomez / University of North Texas
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019

In their seminal book, Islands in History and Representation, Rod Edmond and Vanessa Smith famously point out that stories about islands tend “to slip the net of postcolonial theorising” due to their marginality in terms of geopolitics and academic representation. Accordingly, researchers of Island Studies, an emerging field in the past two decades, have long maintained that due to their geographical and geostrategic singularity, or “islandness,” the (post)colonial conditions of island societies deserve special attention, and the study of which requires a different set of concepts and methodologies than what are available or predominant in Postcolonial Studies.

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