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world literatures and indigenous studies

Call for chapters for edited book (extended)

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 12:24pm
Postmodernism and Narratives of Erasure in Culture, Literature, and Language (edited book)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Editors Hassen Zriba
University of Gafsa, Tunisia

SCMS Panel: Indigeneity and Horror

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:37am
Murray Leeder
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

In his classic essay “An Introduction to the American Horror Film,” Robin Wood establishes the basic formula of the horror film as “normality is threatened by the monster.” He subsequently mentions that if one were to “substitute for ‘Monster’ the term ‘Indians’ . . . one has a formula for a large number of classical Westerns.” Wood’s point is to establish the flexibility of his framework but it also points in another direction: the monstrousness of the idea of Indigeneity within the colonial mindset. Today, one of the most exciting growing areas in horror cinema at the moment comes from Indigenous persons.

Nuancing the Language Debate in African Literature

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:37am
Renee Schatteman/ Georgia State University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

The language debate between Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Chinua Achebe has long defined the discourse about language use in African literature. Achebe’s argument that the writer can “Africanize” the English he or she is using (by infusing words, phrases, idioms, songs, proverbs, stories, dialogue, etc. into the writing) is very compelling because it offers writers a practical means of reaching a wider audience and it ensures African literature a prominent space in the global literary landscape.

Ableism and Anglophone Literature

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:37am
Oxford Brookes University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

C21Literature: Journal of 21st Century Writings

 Call for Papers


Special Issue: “Surveilling the Body: Ableism and Anglophone Literature”

Guest Edited by Dr Susan Flynn and Dr Antonia Mackay

NeMLA 2020 Panel: Social and Self-identity in the Early Modern Spanish Picaresque

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:35am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Early Modern Spain witnessed the birth of the literary and culturally significant picaresque genre with protagonists that existed in liminal spaces that allowed society to fashion them and in turn these pícaros to refashion themselves. Through autobiographies, letters and dialogues, they became manifested not only as beggars, buffoons, thieves, card sharks and prostitutes, but also as animals, actors, rich runaways and academics. This panel seeks papers in English or Spanish that examine how society fashions the picaresque genre’s protagonists and/or how pícaros shape themselves.

The Aesthetics of Drone Warfare

updated: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - 2:56am
Conference hosted by the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 20, 2019

The Aesthetics of Drone Warfare

An International, Interdisciplinary Conference

Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield

7-8 February 2020

 

Keynote speakers:

Debjani Ganguly (University of Virginia)

Derek Gregory (University of British Columbia)

 

On the Edge: Essays on the Representations and Images of Frontiers and Borders in Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - 6:48pm
K. Nowak-McNeice, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

We are looking for contributors to our edited volume, tentatively titled On the Edge: Essays on the Representations and Images of Frontiers and Borders in Literature. We would like to invite submissions considering the keywords of “frontier” and “border” in a literary context, and we are particularly interested in proposals that would give a new, unexpected meaning to these words. The frontier emerged as an important critical concept for an understanding of American history over a hundred years ago, and its status has changed from a celebrated catchphrase to explain away the perplexities of American identity, through an F-word not tolerated in the progressive circles, leading finally to a rehabilitated, more inclusive use.

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