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world literatures and indigenous studies

Edited Collection: “Marine Feet and Vesuvian Eyes”: The Volcanic Aesthetics of Maria Orsini Natale

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:50pm
Wake Forest University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 31, 2020

“The secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment is: to live dangerously! Build your cities on the slopes of Vesuvius!” ~ Nietzsche

 “I have marine feet and Vesuvian eyes, and this belonging to a universe that is land, sea, and lava, my allegiance to a world, not only is a poetic inclination but, in its instinct, a resonant and overwhelming force” ~ Maria Orsini Natale

 


 

 

Russia and Occultism (Extended Deadline)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 7:16pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (Mar 5-8 2020 Boston)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 7, 2019

How does representation of the occult differ across time, such as in pre- and post-Soviet works? How are ghosts, alternative science, paganism, and the supernatural associated with themes and concepts in new Russian texts or new approaches to older works? Potential topics include but are not limited to the intersection of occultism with fantasy, science fiction, visual arts, politics, espionage, or satire.

Submit short bios and 300-word abstracts with a free NeMLA CFP List account at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18275.

Speculative World-Makings: The Environment and Human-Nonhuman Encounters in 21st.C Postcolonial Literary Imaginations

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 1:16pm
ACLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 23, 2019

Postcolonial literary and cultural traditions have been always curious about worldmaking with nonhumans. In their introduction to Postcolonial Ecologies: Literatures of the Environment (2011), Elizabeth M. DeLoughrey and George B. Handley highlight how environmental elements and nonhuman characters have been key witnesses to the injustices of colonialism, globalization, and neo-liberal forms of violence in postcolonial fiction and non-fiction.

Different Voices, Voicing Difference (NEMLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 12:22pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The question of the relation of language to voice traces back to Aristotle’s De interpretatione, with its definition of speech as the sign of thought, and writing the sign of speech. In Jacques Derrida’s account of this phonologocentric model, voice is the ligature of “phōnē and logos,” securing their essential proximity. But if voice is only a mediation, then, as Barbara Johnson writes, voice is no longer “self-identity but self-difference.” Paradoxically, the voice marks the singular but is itself plural, sweeping the self up into an ever-ramifying play of differentiation. As David Lawton proposes, “voice is both a signature, ‘I,’ singularity, and a clear marker of difference, ‘not I,’ multiplicity”.

Feministas Unidas: Fluid Identities in the Globalizing World

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 12:11pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

FemUn at the NEMLA 2020: Boston, MA – March 5-8, 2020

Fluid Identities in the Globalizing World (Feministas Unidas Session)

Feministas Unidas invites you to join our panel on fluid and hybrid identities and their impact on feminist thought, as well as on art created by female and feminist artists in the Hispanic world. We will talk about the ways in which globalization is shaping our understanding of hybridity and its relationship to feminism.

Ekphrastic Mirrors in Transnational Space

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:57am
NeMLA 51st Annual Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The panel invites papers that explore how the chiasmic reflections of an ekphrasis reveal the interior subjectivity, ideology and the desire of its author. In Ancient rhetorical theory, ekphrasis refers to the use of language to make an audience imagine a scene.

Bringing Mythology Back: A Call for the Literary Study of Mythic Narratives

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
2020 NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Mythological narratives constitute a significant portion of the world’s most influential literature; nevertheless, they are glaringly absent from contemporary literary studies. Students interested in the study of mythology are directed to departments of anthropology, religion, or intellectual heritage, and these fields certainly conduct invaluable examinations of world-mythology; however, myths are unequivocally literary in nature, and their omission in departments of literature is both a detriment to the field and a disservice to world cultures. What went wrong with the study of myth-as-literature, and how can we revive this genre to reinvigorate the field of literary studies? 

What went wrong?

Examination Without Misrepresentation: Analyzing Culturally Diverse Narratives

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
2020 NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

How can academics attempt to faithfully translate, interpret, analyze, and/or discuss the creative narratives of cultures and communities to which they have no personal connection? This roundtable will insist that this question, although immensely complex, is not rhetorical—and that we, as students and scholars of literature, language, and culture, are positioned to conduct particularly constructive explorations into possible answers.

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