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world literatures and indigenous studies

Berlin in Film and Fiction: From the Cold War to German Reunification

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Since 1945, Berlin has become a cultural Weltstadt in many ways; this panel would like to focus on three of them. First, the contemporary situation of Berlin in reunified Germany serves as a lens for the flow of people, ideas, rinfluences between Europe and the rest of the world. Second, from 1945-1989, most of the tensions of the Cold War converged in Berlin. Third, for both of these reasons, today a large number of films, novels, and TV programs are set in Berlin, thus making it a privileged place of cultural representation. The purpose of this panel is to study all three of these situations from an international and comparative point of view.

Albert Camus, Our Contemporary?

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

The present literary reputation of Albert Camus is both fascinating and instructive. It is fascinating because, on the one hand, his work is all but absent from global university curricula; yet, he is one of the most widely read authors on the planet. Who has not read The Stranger or The Myth of Sisyphus?

Moreover, Camus and his work are instructive for many reasons.

Revisiting the Great War: From Text to Context

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

World War I marked one of the great turning points in the political, social, and cultural history of Europe and the world.  This panel explores the lived, daily experience of this war by looking at five different forms. Presenters can address these forms in isolation or show the relationships between them. 

First, presenters may analyze and evaluate the experience of the Great War through its literary texts, diaries, or journals. Presenters are encouraged to choose a single passage or two in order to explore the concrete experience of the war. The texts may focus on soldiers, civilians or both. Any text—on the fronts or at home—are suitable for this panel. 

Nietzsche and the Literature of the 19th Century

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

In his lifetime, Nietzsche referred to over 150 nineteenth-century writers in both his published writings and Nachlaß. Nietzsche’s use of nineteenth-century fiction and poetry ranges from somewhat nonchalant to extremely systematic. Indeed, the cornerstone of his “Advent of European Nihilism” in the late 1880s is the decline or decadence of literature during Nietzsche’s lifetime.

The panel attempts to focus on passages, individual novels or poems, and complete bodies of work in order to assess Nietzsche’s use of these texts in his philosophical project.

Heidegger and the Western Literary Tradition

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

 

Heidegger and the Western Literary Tradition.

This panel will investigate the complex relationships between the work of Martin Heidegger and Western literature from the Greeks until the 20th century. Three distinct questions or areas of investigation will be treated: 

• How did Heidegger use a specific writer in one or more of his philosophical writings?  
• How does Heidegger’s use of a given writer relate to our current understanding of the works and themes of this writer?
• Are there thematic points of contact between Heidegger’s work and literary authors that Heidegger may not have mentioned? Can we point out specific limitations that might result from Heidegger’s philosophical methodology?

Lifewriting Annual - Call for Book Reviews

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 2:56pm
Rob Ward (Brown University)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Lifewriting Annual: Biographical and Autobiographical Studies (AMS Press) seeks reviews of recent publications, including autobiographies, memoirs, letters, and so on. Word length: 1000-1500 words. Citation style: Chicago, 16th edition (author/date). Deadline for submission: December 1st, 2016. Expected publication of volume 6: 2017. Please get in touch with short proposals and questions. 

Publish your paper in Nova Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 2:58pm
Nova Explore Publications
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Manuscripts of original scientific researches, reviews, short communications and Case reports, E-books and Thesis from researchers are invited for submission to   support@novaexplore.com for publishing in Nova Explore journals, an open access peer-review publications in Canada. 

Nova Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (NJHSS) is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that publishes original research articles as well as review articles in several areas of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies. The journal’s Editorial Board is divided into the 55 subject areas related to Humanities and Social Sciences. 

MFS Special Issue - Inter-imperiality

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:05pm
Modern Fiction Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017

Inter-imperiality
Guest Editor: Laura Doyle
Deadline for Submissions: 1 June 2017

The editors of MFS seek essays that engage with the concept of inter-imperiality, as developed in the recent PMLA “Theories and Methodologies” cluster (March 2015) and elsewhere. The global turn in literary and cultural studies, although productive, sometimes elides the post/colonial, economic, and other historical or geopolitical conditions of literary-cultural production. We solicit essays that offset this tendency by reading literary-cultural texts within an inter-imperial framework.

CfP: Out of This World: strangeness, estrangement and alienation in Global South literature

updated: 
Sunday, September 4, 2016 - 2:31am
Alya El Hosseiny / ACLA 2017 (Utrecht, July 6-9)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

Narratives of discovery have long been produced in Europe about the Global South. Whether travel narratives describing the wonders of the New World, tales of survival in a savage Africa, or a nineteenth-century poet's Voyage en Orient, these texts have made of the Global South the site of estrangement and reexamination of the European self. However, the non-European subject is left unexplored, as in Camus' The Stranger, a novel taking place in French-colonized Algeria, and which notoriously elides the non-European Other, the unnamed Arab murder victim. In this seminar, we turn the tables to examine narratives of estrangement and alienation in Global South literature.

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