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world literatures and indigenous studies

Deadline Approaching: (Un)Moorings Conference

updated: 
Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 9:31pm
(Un)Moorings Conference, Emory University, Departments of English, French and Italian, and Comparative Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 5, 2018

 

 

The Departments of

Comparative Literature – English – French and Italian,

Global & Postcolonial Studies (GPS)

announce:

 

(UN)Moorings

An Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference

Friday, April 20, 2018

 

Keynote Speaker:

Dr. Emmanuel Bruno Jean-François,

Pennsylvania State University

*Deadline: Dec. 15* - American Literature in the World Graduate Conference, Yale University, April 6, 2018

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 10:18am
Yale University, Department of English
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 15, 2017

The conference hopes to broaden the scope of American literature, opening it to more complex geographies, and to a variety of genres and media. The impetus comes partly from a survey of what is currently in the field: it is impossible to read the work of Toni Morrison and Junot Díaz, Yusef Komunyakaa and Carolyn Forché, Tony Kushner and Lynn Nottage without seeing that, for all these authors, the reference frame is no longer simply the United States, but a larger, looser, more contextually varied set of coordinates, populated by laboring bodies, migrating faiths, generational sagas, memories of war, as well as the accents of unforgotten tongues, the taste and smell of beloved foods and spices.

Can the Migrant Speak?

updated: 
Monday, January 8, 2018 - 12:28am
Harvard University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 15, 2018

“Can the Migrant Speak?”
Romance Languages and Literatures Graduate Student Conference Harvard University
April 6-7, 2018

Keynote Speakers:
Prof. Sandra Ponzanesi (Utrecht University)
Prof. Amy Sara Carroll (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor)

“Can the Migrant Speak?” engages with the figure and agency of the migrant. It is not often that we hear about - or listen to - the migratory experience from those undergoing it themselves. By asking this question during a time of tumultuous political change, we directly address the roles of our disciplines, and academia as a whole, in relation to this issue that continues to shape lives across the globe in powerful ways.

Articles on the Monstrous/Uncanny

updated: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 12:24pm
MEARCSTAPA
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017

MEARCSTAPA

Call for Papers

 

MEARCSTAPA (Monsters: The Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory and Practical Application) invites papers on any topic of Monsters/Monster theory, or the Supernatural/Uncanny for a special issue of the journal Preternature (PSU Press). The special issue will celebrate MEARCSTAPA’s tenth anniversary as an academic society dedicated to the study of the monstrous.

 

HyperCultura - issue on Nationalism - deadline extension December 15th

updated: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 12:23pm
HyperCultura/Hyperion University, Bucharest, Romania
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 15, 2017

Dear all,

 

We would like to announce you that we will extend the deadline for full article submission, at several of our contributors' request, until DECEMBER, 15th, 2017!

 We will attach again our theme description

http://litere.hyperion.ro/hypercultura/_menu_item_forthcoming_issues/

 Our submission guidelines

http://litere.hyperion.ro/hypercultura/submission-guidelines/

 and here, a brief explanation of our double-blind peer review policy

Fantasy and Myth in the Anthropocene

updated: 
Friday, December 1, 2017 - 11:19am
Department of Czech Literature and Library Studies, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Fantasy and Myth in the Anthropocene

International Conference 

October 3-5, 2018

Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic

 

“The relationship between myth and fantasy is a particularly convoluted one. ... [B]oth words have so many meanings and applications that they can be synonyms or direct contraries.” 

(Brian Attebery, Stories about Stories)

 

“Constructing and Controlling Indigenous Identity Through Place: ‘Location, Location, Location’”

updated: 
Friday, December 1, 2017 - 11:17am
Bernadette V. Russo/Texas Tech University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017

Scholarly Submissions

Indigenous identity is connected to place, perhaps rooted most strongly in the relationship between place and self rather than simply the location itself. In the chapter “A Better World Becoming: Placing Critical Indigenous Studies” appearing in Aileen Moreton’s essay collection Critical Indigenous Studies: Engagements in First World Locations, Daniel Heath Justice explains that, “Belonging is about being woven into the fabric of the land and its legacies, accepting the knowledge that your future is a shared future . . .” (26).

 

Translation Review

updated: 
Friday, December 1, 2017 - 11:17am
Translation Review
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 31, 2018

Translation Review is now inviting submissions of literary translations—excerpts of novels, short stories, and poetry. We are particularly interested in translations of contemporary authors.

Nature and Narrative: Writing, Literature and Pedagogy in the Anthropocene

updated: 
Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 12:20pm
Saint Louis University Madrid
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 31, 2017

Conference to be held in Madrid on June 22-23, 2018

 

Keynote speakers: Dr. Joni Adamson and Dr. Scott Slovic

 

Since the discovery of DNA the metaphor of writing to the genetic makeup of living beings has been a tempting one to engage. As George and Muriel Beadle wrote in 1966 (and as Marcello Barbieri points to in his essay “What is Biosemiotics?”) “The deciphering of the genetic code has revealed our possession of a language much older than hieroglyphics, a language as old as life itself, a language that is the most living language of all—even if its letters are invisible and its words are buried in the cells of our bodies” (Beadle and Beadle 1966). 

 

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