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displaying 1 - 15 of 50

CFP: [Ethnic] Popular Culture and American Indians/First Peoples

updated: 
Tuesday, September 18, 2007 - 12:47am
Scott Andrews

If you have a project concerning works by North American native
artists/writers that can be discussed under the rather broad umbrella of
"popular culture," please send a 250-word proposal to me at
scott.andrews_at_csun.edu. This is for a proposed panel at the Native
American Literature Symposium on March 27-29 at the Mystic Lake Hotel and
Casino just outside Minneapolis, Minn. Your project could involve music,
television, cinema, performance art, comic books, graphic
novels, stand-up comedy, graffiti, powwow souvenirs, advertising,
MySpace... you get the idea.

Please send your proposals by Oct. 15.

CFP: [Victorian] "Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 8:15pm
Grace Wetzel

"Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility
A Graduate English Conference sponsored by the University of South
Carolina
Dates: March 7-8, 2008
Keynote Speaker: Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley

Immigrants and expatriots, sailors and soldiers, travelers and wanderers,
men and women: people in the nineteenth century were moving. Novels and
new inventions such as railroads, steamships, and street cars provided
vehicles of transport for individuals and their imaginations, while the
transnational movements of ideas and populations gave rise to a newly
globalized Anglo-American literature.

CFP: [Graduate] "Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 8:14pm
Grace Wetzel

"Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility
A Graduate English Conference sponsored by the University of South
Carolina
Dates: March 7-8, 2008
Keynote Speaker: Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley

Immigrants and expatriots, sailors and soldiers, travelers and wanderers,
men and women: people in the nineteenth century were moving. Novels and
new inventions such as railroads, steamships, and street cars provided
vehicles of transport for individuals and their imaginations, while the
transnational movements of ideas and populations gave rise to a newly
globalized Anglo-American literature.

CFP: [20th] Kurt Vonnegut

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 7:33pm
Erik Grayson

Stirrings Still: The International Journal of Existential Literature is
currently accepting submissions for an upcoming issue devoted to the life
and work of Kurt Vonnegut. In addition to critical essays on Vonnegut's
fiction, we are interested in brief tribute essays in which the author
reflects upon reading/discovering/meeting Vonnegut. We will consider all
submissions sent electronically through December 15, 2007.

Writers should contact our editor, Erik Grayson, at egrayson_at_elmira.edu
with any questions or submissions.

CFP: [Graduate] Popular Culture Association Conference - Soap Opera Division

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 6:47pm
Barbara J. Irwin

Call for Papers

The Soap Opera area of the Popular Culture Association is seeking paper
submissions and abstracts for the joint meeting of the Popular Culture
Association and American Culture Association at the San Francisco Marriott
Hotel in San Francisco, California, March 19-22, 2008.

Proposals and papers addressing all aspects of this important cultural form
from a variety of perspectives -- historical, critical, economic,
cross-cultural, interdisciplinary, among others -- are welcome.

Please submit papers and/or abstracts of 250 words by November 9, 2007 to:

CFP: [Collections] Comics, Graphic Narrative, and Sequential Art

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 6:22pm
James F. Wurtz

Comics, Graphic Narrative, and Sequential Art : Call for Contributors for
a proposed collection
Editors: Jake Jakaitis and James F. Wurtz, Indiana State University

Deadline for Submission of Abstract: 1 February 2008

CFP: [American] U.S. Latino/a Literature

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 6:08pm
Joseph M. Viera

College English Association National Conference
March 27-29, 2008
St. Louis, Missouri

We invite papers on U.S. Latino/a Literature for the 39th annual meeting of
the CEA.

Proposals should be submitted via the online database at
http://english.ttu.edu/cea/conftool by November 1st, 2007.

When you submit your proposal, you may use a pull-down menu to indicate your
topic. Indicate at that pull-down menu that your submission should be directed
to me, Joseph M. Viera, chair of the U.S. Latino/a Literature panels.

To preserve time for discussion, CEA limits presentations to 15 minutes.

CFP: [Graduate] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:12pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [Computing-Internet] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:12pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [General] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:11pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [Theory] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:11pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [20th] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:11pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [Victorian] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:11pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

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