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UPDATE: [Collections] Literature in the Early American Republic (LEAR)

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 7:34pm
Matthew Wynn Sivils

LITERATURE IN THE EARLY AMERICAN REPUBLIC (LEAR), an annual, peer-reviewed
journal published by AMS Press welcomes a wide range of submissions on the
literary culture of the United States from the adoption of the Constitution
in 1789 to the death of James Fenimore Cooper in 1851. We also seek
submissions addressing (or establishing critical editions of) unpublished
archival manuscripts (letters, diaries, poems, and other documents) of
cultural or literary relevance to the period.

CFP: [African-American] AAAHRP 2009 Biennial Black History Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 7:00pm
Ed Diaz

The Association for African American Historical Research and Preservation
(AAAHRP) is accepting proposals for individual papers, panels, and
workshops for its 2009 Biennial Black History Conference. The conference
is scheduled to be held on Saturday, March 21 and Sunday, March 22, 2009
in Seattle, Washington, U.S.A. The Theme of the conference is "Black
History: Full Disclosure." Participants are encouraged to present papers,
introduce original documentaries, form panels, and conduct workshops.

CFP: [20th] Contemporary British Masculinities

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 3:53pm
Theodore Miller

40th Anniversary Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
Feb. 26-March 1, 2009 Boston, Massachusetts
Local Host: Boston University

Celebrating 40 years!

CFP: Contemporary British Masculinities

 â€œIdentity is the primal form of ideology”
(Adorno, Negative Dialectics 148)

CFP: [20th] NeMLA (2/26-3/1/-09) Women and the City in Early Twentieth Century Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 1:40pm
Elizabeth Foley O'Connor

In the Politics of Modernism Raymond Williams argues that modernism cannot
be fully comprehended without taking into consideration the metropolis as a
place “beyond both city and nation in their older senses,” which developed
out of the “magnetic concentration of wealth and power in imperial capitals
and the simultaneous cosmopolitan access to a wide variety of subordinate
cultures” (44). It was in these vibrant, culturally diverse cities where
people from a variety of backgrounds could freely interact that new
attitudes were most eagerly adopted and social mores and class hierarchies
were most easily broken down. Moreover, the metropolis can be seen as a key

UPDATE: [International] Buried Treasures Theatre Symposium at Royal Holloway University of London

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 11:24am
Marissia Fragkou

Royal Holloway, University of London and The British Library

Invite you to

BURIED TREASURES
A ONE- DAY SYMPOSIUM
Saturday 27th September 2008
The Noh Studio, RHUL

How many remediated Elizas teetered simultaneously across the breaking
ice on London stages?
When did the first English boxing champion appear in a pantomime? Why?
What had a greater cultural impact â€" the Crimean War or men in
moustaches? Crinolines, bloomers or garroting?
Was Elizabeth Braddon’s play really less successful than Lady Audley’s
Secret?
Who was the great, forgotten dramatist of the middle of the 19th century?

CFP: [Renaissance] Changes and Innovations

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 11:05am
Muriel Cunin and Martine Yvernault

An international interdisciplinary conference organized by EHIC at the
University of Limoges, France, 9-10 October 2009

Moving World(s): Changes and Innovations in Late Medieval
and Early Renaissance Europe

CFP: [Medieval] Changes and Innovations

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 11:04am
Muriel Cunin and Martine Yvernault

An international interdisciplinary conference organized by EHIC at the
University of Limoges, France, 9-10 October 2009

Moving World(s): Changes and Innovations in Late Medieval
and Early Renaissance Europe

CFP: [Ethnic] Asian American Literature online journal: AALRPP

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 6:53am
Noelle Brada-Williams

ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE:
READING, PEDAGOGY, PRACTICE

Editor
Noelle Brada-Williams, San José State University
Editorial Board
• Karen Chow, De Anza College
• Wei-Ming Dariotis, San Francisco State University
• Eileen Fung, University of San Francisco
• Rowena Tomaneng, De Anza College

CFP: [Cultural-Historical] Marking the Event - 20th Annual Tufts University Graduate Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 7, 2008 - 3:49am
Laurel Hankins

20th Annual Tufts University English Graduate Organization Conference
Friday, October 24, 2008

MARKING THE EVENT

Keynote Address: Professor Michael Warner, Yale University

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE:
The Event changes everything. And yet we have difficulty defining the
event. How do we theorize the transitory? As community members, we mark
events with ceremonies of celebration and mourning. As scholars, we
strive to leave our critical mark. Ultimately we must ask ourselves, do
we mark the event or does the event mark us?

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