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CFP: [20th] ACLA (Due Nov 3rd): Global Dictator Fictions Panel

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 11:29pm
Jennifer Harford Vargas

ACLA 2009 Convention
March 26-29, 2009
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA

"The Form of Power, the Power of Form: Global Dictator Fictions"

Co-chairs: Ulka Anjaria and Jennifer Harford Vargas

CFP: [20th] The flawed hero in the graphic novel

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 11:03pm
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand

How do graphic novelists, such as Frank Miller and Stan Lee, portray the
flawed hero, or “anti-hero”? How do these graphic novels utilize
illustrations, along with words, to convey the characteristics embodied
by these flawed heroes? Is the character of the flawed hero an important
facet of the genre? Connecticut Review is looking for academic essays
that address the character of the flawed hero in the graphic novel. Your
work should be 2,000 to 4,000 words. Submit work to:
clermontm_at_easternct.edu in hypertext form or send 2 hard copies to:
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand, Senior Editor
Connecticut Review
CSU System Office
39 Woodland Street
Hartford CT 06105-2337

CFP: [Film] The problematizing of the dramatic dyad in 20th Century television

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 11:00pm
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand

How do 20th Century television shows, such as “The Honeymooners” and “All
in the Family,” portray married couples in turmoil? How do television
shows, such as “Starsky and Hutch” and “ER,” dramatize the conflicts
faced by people who are partners, both platonic and romantic? How is
the “situation comedy” dependent on couples fighting? Connecticut Review
is looking for academic essays related to the problematizing of the
dramatic dyad in 20th Century television. Your work should be 2,000 to
4,000 words. Submit work to: clermontm_at_easternct.edu in hypertext form or
send 2 hard copies to:
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand, Senior Editor
Connecticut Review
CSU System Office

CFP: [18th] Representing the non-believer in early American literature

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 10:59pm
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand

How did the authors of 18th and 19th Century American literature
represent the character of the non-believer in their works? For instance,
how did an author, such as Nathaniel Hawthorne in the story, “Young
Goodman Brown,” portray the perceived dangers of questioning faith? What
are the consequences for such characters due to their secular philosophy?
How does such secularism reflect the philosophy upon which the United
States federal government was built on? Connecticut Review is looking for
academic essays dealing with the representation of the non-believer in
early American literature. Your work should be 2,000 to 4,000 words.

CFP: [Cultural-Historical] Kinship in Shakespeareâs histories

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 10:56pm
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand

In what ways does Shakespeare establish continuity of family and dramatic
events through such plays as Henry IV Part 1 and 2, and Henry V? Is it
important to read Shakespeare’s historical plays as meditations on family
relations, or are the kinships portrayed merely as points of historic
detail? How historically accurate are Shakespeare’s portrayals of these
royal kinships? Connecticut Review is looking for academic essays
addressing kinship and its representation in Shakespeare’s histories.
Your work should be 2,000 to 4,000 words. Submit work to:
clermontm_at_easternct.edu in hypertext form or send 2 hard copies to:
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand, Senior Editor
Connecticut Review

CFP: [American] Edith Wharton Essay Prize and Call for Submissions

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 10:56pm
Donna Campbell

The Edith Wharton Society invites submissions for its journal, The Edith
Wharton Review, and for its fourth annual Edith Wharton Essay Prize. The
Edith Wharton Review is a peer-reviewed journal published twice a year. It
is indexed in the MLA Bibliography, and it publishes articles related to
Edith Wharton, her life, and her works. More information is available at
http://www.edithwhartonsociety.org/ewr.htm.

The Edith Wharton Essay Prize
Submission Deadline: April 30, 2008

CFP: [Postcolonial] Post-Colonial readings of The Tempest

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 10:54pm
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand

How does Shakespeare use the storm in The Tempest to portray the fear and
impact of outside forces on an exotic location? What are some ways in
which The Tempest could be read as a criticism of Colonial meddling? In
what way is this Colonial meddling rectified, such as when Prospero uses
his magic to return the outsiders to Italy? Connecticut Review is looking
for academic post-Colonial readings of The Tempest. Your work should be
2,000 to 4,000 words. Submit work to: clermontm_at_easternct.edu in
hypertext form or send 2 hard copies to:
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand, Senior Editor
Connecticut Review
CSU System Office
39 Woodland Street
Hartford CT 06105-2337

CFP: [20th] Elevating the trivial in 21st Century fiction

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 10:52pm
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand

How do 21st Century authors, such as Melissa Bank and Tobias Wolff, take
everyday observations and elevate them to give them literary weight? What
sorts of themes are focused on when such authors emphasize such trivial
everyday occurrences? Do these works of fiction represent the emergence
of a universal 21st Century literary voice? Connecticut Review is looking
for academic essays on how 21st Century fiction elevates the trivial.
Your work should be 2,000 to 4,000 words. Submit work to:
clermontm_at_easternct.edu in hypertext form or send 2 hard copies to:
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand, Senior Editor
Connecticut Review
CSU System Office
39 Woodland Street
Hartford CT 06105-2337

CFP: [Victorian] Images of children in 19th century British fiction

updated: 
Sunday, October 19, 2008 - 10:50pm
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand

How did 19th Century British authors, such as Charles Dickens, portray
images of children in their literary works? How does Dickens portray
children, as in Oliver Twist and David Copperfield, as characters caught
up in an economic and political class struggle? Does Dickens use these
images of children to personalize these class struggles? Connecticut
Review is looking for academic essays addressing the images of children
in 19th century British fiction. Your work should be 2,000 to 4,000
words. Submit work to: clermontm_at_easternct.edu in hypertext form or send
2 hard copies to:
Meredith Clermont-Ferrand, Senior Editor
Connecticut Review
CSU System Office
39 Woodland Street

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