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CFP-Kate Chopin International Society at SSSL Conference, 8-11 April 2010

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 9:52pm
Kate Chopin International Society

Call for Proposals for Kate Chopin Panel for 2010 Society for the Study of Southern Literature Conference

The Kate Chopin International Society seeks submissions for a panel for the 2010 conference of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature, slated for 8-11 April in New Orleans, LA.

CFP: Race and Gender-- Special Summer Supplement to MP Journal

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 6:29pm
MP Journal

MP Journal (http://www.academinist.org ) is an international, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed online journal dedicated to feminism and women's studies. Our journal is proudly indexed by Academic Search Premier,EBSCO Host. We are currently seeking submissions for our special summer supplemental mini- edition. Our theme is Diversity: The Intersection of race/diversity and gender. Quality, well supported papers on any topic related to race and feminism or women's studies are welcome for consideration. Please send papers along with a 50 word bio and a resume /CV to Lynda_hinkle@yahoo.com by July 31, 2009

[UPDATE] Chaucer and Adaptation - New Chaucer Society Congress 2010

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 3:35pm
Dana Symons (session organizer), Buffalo State College

Scholars' increased interest in studying the translation, popularization, and adaptation of Chaucer's works has parallels in Chaucer's growing visibility in popular culture in the last ten years, from the 1998 animated Canterbury Tales television series and the 2003 BBC adaptations of six tales to the appearance of Geoffrey Chaucer as a character in the 2001 movie A Knight's Tale. Chaucer's works, particularly The Canterbury Tales, have undergone myriad other adaptations, including fifteenth-century additions, John Dryden's "translations" and other often bowdlerized eighteenth-century modernizations, and Pasolini's twentieth-century X-rated movie version, to name but a few.

III Gothic Congress: The Monster in Art and its Different Manifestations; UNAM (Mexico City, March 22-24, 2010)

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 2:59pm
Tony Alcala, FFyL, UNAM

The Gothic Literature is just beginning to be accepted as a literary field worth of study among Mexican scholars. The doors remain open to deepen into the study of a style whose manifestations go beyond time, culture and genre boundaries.

Objetive: After the great response received in the two previous Gothic Congresses (2008 & 2009), this time the aim is to keep encouraging the interest in the Gothic among both students and scholars at the UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico) and other Mexican institutions. To achieve this, we propose to start from the study of the Monster as a central character among a series of other conventions that reappear in the Gothic into different contexts.

Chaucer and Adaptation - Session 4 of New Chaucer Society 2010 Congress

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 2:09pm
Dana Symons (session organizer)

Scholars' increased interest in studying the translation, popularization, and adaptation of Chaucer's works has parallels in Chaucer's growing visibility in popular culture in the last ten years, from the 1998 animated Canterbury Tales television series and the 2003 BBC adaptations of six tales to the appearance of Geoffrey Chaucer as a character in the 2001 movie A Knight's Tale. Chaucer's works, particularly The Canterbury Tales, have undergone myriad other adaptations, including fifteenth-century additions, John Dryden's "translations" and other often bowdlerized eighteenth-century modernizations, and Pasolini's twentieth-century X-rated movie version, to name but a few.

[UPDATE] CFP: ECONOMY OF FORM, DEADLINE EXTENDED to JULY 19

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 1:09pm
21st Annual Tufts University English Graduate Organization Conference

Keynote Address: Professor Franco Moretti, Stanford University
Economy can imply plenitude or lack, wisdom or deprivation. Forms impose limits and shape
possibilities, provide models and restrict meanings. Lately, the word "economy" has been
synonymous with collapse and structural failure. As the world reevaluates the mechanisms
of capitalism, we want to take this opportunity to reevaluate our systems of intellectual
trade, to interrogate how our ideas are formed and how they function.

Mapping Medieval Lives of Christ

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 10:55am
Ryan Perry, Queen's University of Belfast

The culmination of the AHRC funded "Geographies of Orthodoxy" project, the "Mapping Late Medieval Lives of Christ" conference invites papers on any aspect of late medieval Christological piety, with a particular emphasis on the cultural manifestations of the pseudo‐Bonaventuran tradition, in all European contexts. Topics might include:

• The production and reception of late medieval lives
of Christ

• Lives of Christ in visual and material culture

• Political and theological controversies

• Lives of Christ, Latin and vernacular

• Lives of Christ across the Reformations

• Lives of Christ and histories of the book

• Lay access and pastoral care

The Multicultural Middle Ages (Sept. 30, 2009 ; NEMLA Montreal April 7-11 2010)

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 9:42am
Erin Mullally / Le Moyne College

The European Middle Ages are far from insular, as authors of the period repeatedly remind us. How are cross-cultural encounters and their consequent problems involving language difference or ethnic and religious others depicted? When are differences elided and when are they emphasized? This panel seeks papers exploring any aspect of cross-cultural connections as represented in medieval narratives.
41st Annual NEMLA convention in Montreal Quebec from April 7-11, 2010.
Send abstracts to Erin Mullally, English Dept. Le Moyne College, by Sept. 30, 2009 at mullalee@lemoyne.edu

Exhibiting Capital(s): Berlin and Beyond (NeMLA); Montreal (15.9.2009; 7-11.4.2010)

updated: 
Monday, July 6, 2009 - 9:02am
Peter McIsaac / York University, Toronto

Modern German cities, particularly regional and national capitals, have often been studied in relation to German national identity. For this reason, cultural displays (for instance, films and exhibitions) in and of these metropoles are often seen to demonstrate unique brandings, unique particularizations of space that define major cities with respect to each other and their national cultures. Much recent scholarship on post-unification Berlin, for instance, evidences this kind of perspective and has furthered a unifying comprehension of the new Republic as it is manifested in the re-made city. Our panel seeks to unsettle such predominant spatial analysis through focusing more closely on the heterogeneity of urban branding practices.