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Women as Leaders in Education: Succeeding Despite Inequity, Discrimination, and Other Challenges

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 11:02pm
Jennifer L. Martin/Oakland University

Women as Leaders in Education: Succeeding Despite Inequity, Discrimination, and Other Challenges (working title), a new book published by Praeger, will bring together a multidisciplinary and multicultural discussion of issues women educators face, including differences in leadership styles, obstacles to advancement, and pay, benefit and resource inequity. This book will address themes of ethical decision making, authority, power and leadership, and conflict in organizational life. It will also discuss interconnections among equity issues: sex, race, class, age, sexual orientation, and disability.

Prism journal 2010 special issues on gender and public relations, social media and public relations

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 7:46pm
PRism journal

PRism journal currently has two calls for papers for next year's special issues, on Gender and Public Relations (see http://praxis.massey.ac.nz/cfp_gender.html) and Online Social Networks, Communication Practice, and Public Relations (see http://praxis.massey.ac.nz/cfp_socialnet.html). The editors of these special issues would love to hear from you now with an expression of interest if you're thinking about contributing in the new year. Critical and interdisciplinary articles are welcomed.

Popular Romance Studies: Theory, Text and Practice - Brussels, Belgium - August 5-7 2010

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 7:36pm
International Association for the Study of Popular Romance

The International Association for the Study of Popular Romance (IASPR) is seeking proposals for innovative panels, papers, roundtables, discussion groups, and multi-media presentations that contribute to a sustained conversation about romantic love and its representations in popular media throughout the world, from antiquity to the present. We welcome analyses of individual texts—books, films, websites, songs, performances—as well as broader inquiries into the creative industries that produce and market popular romance and into the emerging critical practice of popular romance studies.
This conference has three main goals:

Speculations CFP

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 7:05pm
Speculations: The Journal of Object Oriented Ontology

Speculations: The Journal of Object Oriented Ontology

CALL FOR PAPERS

Speculations invites articles on topics related to object oriented philosophy, speculative realism or post-continental philosophy for its inaugural issue. Articles should not exceed 8000 words and should conform to the author's guidelines outlined on the website. Submissions can be sent
electronically via the journal website or directly to the following e-mail address: speculationsjournal@gmail.com

Constituting Citizenship: National & Transnational Perspectives

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 7:02pm
Graduate Student Symposium in American Studies Purdue University

The symposium committee of the American Studies
Program at Purdue University invites proposals and
abstracts for papers and panels for its annual graduate
student symposium. Building on the work, exchange,
and discussions at the 2009 ASA conference, the title
of this year's symposium is "Constituting Citizenship:
National & Transnational Perspectives." While we
welcome submissions on a wide range of topics
centering on the concept of citizenship (be it
political/legal, cultural, consumer, sexual, global,
corporate, or virtual), we are especially interested in
such issues as belonging, the construction,
constitution, and management of citizenship, political

Kore Dissertation Award

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 5:20pm
Association for Study of Women and Mythology

The Association for the Study of Women and Mythology announces the Kore Award for best dissertation in women and mythology, offered annually in even-numbered years for dissertations completed in the previous two calendar years. Applicants can be from any discipline, including but not limited to literature, religious studies, art or art history, classics, anthropology, and communications. Creative dissertations must include significant analysis of mythology in addition to creative work. All dissertations must be in English. Applicants must include letter of recommendation from dissertation advisor or member of dissertation review committee. All materials must be sent electronically.

"The Green Goddess: Ecofeminism and Women's Spirituality"

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 5:18pm
Association for Study of Women and Mythology

Proposals for papers, panels and workshops are sought for the first national meeting of the Association for the Study of Women and Mythology. The theme of the conference, to be held April 23-25 near Scranton, PA, is "The Green Goddess: Ecofeminism and Women's Spirituality," to deal with spiritual aspects of the natural and built landscape, as well as mythic interpretations and interrogations of "the earth as goddess" paradigm. Papers and panels addressing that topic will be given preference, but other subjects will be considered. Papers should be 20 minutes; up to four papers on a related topic may be proposed together. Workshops (limited to 90 minutes) should be organized to provide audience interaction and must clearly address theme.

The Portrayal of Formerly Colonized Peoples in Literature

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 2:53pm
LITERARY HORIZONS JOURNAL

Recently, Chinua Achebe, the doyen of African literature, described Joseph Conrad as portraying Africans in a "terribly terribly wrong" fashion in Heart of Darkness. Achebe's assertion rejuvenates the question of the depiction of the colonized peoples in books written by colonizers, neocolonizers, and contemporary Western authors. Given this background, the Literary Horizons Journal, a journal dedicated solely to publishing the work of graduate students, is soliciting papers that explore the portrayal of formerly colonized peoples, cultures, and themes in works written by Western authors or Western-leaning indigenous authors.

William Dean Howells at the ALA in San Francisco (May 27-30, 2010)

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 12:36pm
The William Dean Howells Society

The William Dean Howells Society is sponsoring the following two panels at the 2010 American Literature Association annual conference, which will be held this year in San Francisco on May 27-30:

1.Howells and Capitalism: As the American economy struggles to regain its footing, we are interested in papers on any aspect of Howells's work that touches on his ideas and attitudes toward capitalism, which became more contentions in his later years.

2.Open Topic: We are interested in papers that touch upon any topic in Howells's work. We are especially keen to hear about new directions in Howells scholarship and/or texts that often get overlooked.

Travel Writings and their Social Impact

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 12:29pm
The Connecticut Review

Travel Writing

Travel literature has emerged over the centuries to include a number of masterpieces from the Odyssey, to Gulliver's Travels. In these works, writers often describe new and foreign lands, never accounted for in full detail until that point, though the validity of those descriptions were and are often challenged. Some argue that travel writers embellish their tales, much to the detriment of those they depict, while others assert those writers impart useful insight in relation to how members in society come to terms with encountering more and various civilizations, as they become more advanced socially and technologically.

21st-Century American Literature

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 12:15pm
Proposed Collection of Essays

We are looking for essays to round out a proposed collection that explores American literature – or literature about America – written since the year 2000. What characterizes American literature in the early years of the 21st century, a decade in which many have marked as the end of the so-called "American Century"? What differentiates 21st century literature from 20th century literature? What themes continue from the 20th to the 21st centuries, and to what purpose? How have political, cultural, international, and economic events of the past decade challenged America's perception of itself or introduced new elements to the national narrative? Indeed, what is the role of literature itself in 21st century America?

Turning on Rights: Politics, Performance, and the Text April 16-17, 2010 University at Albany Keynote Speaker: Joseph Slaughter

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 11:59am
University at Albany, SUNY English Graduate Student Organization

"We must more than ever stand on the side of human rights. We need human rights. We are in need of them and they are in need, for there is always a lack, a shortfall, a falling short, an insufficiency; human rights are never sufficient." (Jacques Derrida, Philosophy in a Time of Terror)

If human rights are insufficient yet necessary, we must then ask what to do with "rights." This conference will explore historical and theoretical definitions, constructions, and performative notions of rights. How do texts challenge predominant conceptual narratives of rights? In what ways does literature explore notions of rights outside of the juridical realm? Can we have a discourse on rights that exceeds the anthropomorphic field?

[UPDATE] Exploring the Edge of Trauma, 13 - 16 May 2010. Deadline for abstracts 5 January 2010

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 11:10am
Kingston University in association with McMaster University

EXPLORING THE EDGE OF TRAUMA

13 May to 16 May 2010
West Dean Conference Centre , West Dean College, West Dean, Chichester, PO18 0QZ

The 7th Cultural Intersections International Colloquium, presented by:
-Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Kingston University, London, UK
-Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, Kingston University, London, UK
-Department of Languages and Linguistics, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada

Colloquium organisers: Professor Fran Lloyd, Professor Lieve Spaas

Traveling on the Force of Change: Travel Writing in the Age of Henry Adams; Am Lit Assn, 5/27/2010; 1/20/2010

updated: 
Monday, December 14, 2009 - 10:15am
Society for American Travel Writing and henry Adams Society

In The Education of Henry Adams, Adams contrasts the "force" of the automobile for shaping lives of commercial travelers with the "force" that motivated the construction of the Gothic cathedral. In light of this differentiation, The Society for American Travel Writing and the Henry Adams Society invite proposals for papers on the travel writings of late 19th and early 20th Century American writers who struggle to define the ways in which new technologies are reshaping travel, identity, and their experience of the world. Possible topic questions might be: How do accounts of travel help shape American popular thought or notions of identity?

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