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Traffic in Translation: the Task of Derrida and Deleuze (ACLA, Vancouver, March 31-April 3, 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 11:37pm
Yen-Chen Chuang, Tamkang University

This seminar seeks papers focusing on the theory of translation from the perspectives of Derrida or Deleuze. Is translation an impossible task, an ethics that lends an ear to the other? Or is translation a matter of creative concepts? How do we develop the idea of (in)fidelity in terms of the strange friendship between the two philosophers? What is the relationship between linguistic signs and recognition/the unrecognizable? Possible paper topics may include but are not limited to:

Traffic in Translation: the Task of Derrida and Deleuze (ACLA, March 31-April 3, 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 10:42pm
Yen-Chen Chuang, Tamkang University

This seminar seeks papers focusing on the theory of translation from the perspectives of Derrida or Deleuze. Is translation an impossible task, an ethics that lends an ear to the other? Or is translation a matter of creative concepts? How do we develop the idea of (in)fidelity in terms of the strange friendship between the two philosophers? What is the relationship between linguistic signs and recognition/the unrecognizable? Possible paper topics may include but not limited to:

American Literature as World Literature: Making/Mapping New Worlds, ACLA 2011 Seminar, Vancouver, March 31-April 3

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 7:18pm
Lindsey Andrews, Duke University; Michelle Koerner, Duke University

How has American literature understood itself as "world literature"? This seminar is interested not only in the ways American literature "contains" the world (as a multi-national literature) but also in the ways American literature is in the world. We want to think of World Literature not only as a category that describes multi-national or global literatures, but also as a literary and political strategy: the making of new worlds.

Oklahoma State University English Graduate Conference

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 7:07pm
Oklahoma State University English Graduate Students Association

The English Graduate Student Association (EGSA) at Oklahoma State University, an organization of English graduate students and faculty members committed to promoting student academic development and scholastic achievement, is currently accepting proposals for its annual graduate conference March 4-5 2011 in Stillwater, OK.

CFP: Margaret Garner: The Libretto

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 6:46pm
La Vinia Delois Jennings

CFP: Margaret Garner: The Libretto. Critical articles are sought for an edited volume on Toni Morrison's libretto,_Margaret Garner_. Because the volume will serve as a historical commemoration as well as a critical study, scholars who experienced the libretto as a performed text by attending the opera at its premiere in Detroit, Cincinnati, and/or Philadelphia with the original cast members, stage designer, and director are especially encouraged to contribute to this project. Interested contributors should submit an abstract of 200 words before January 15, 2011. Essays are due August 1, 2011 and must be more than 6,000 words and fewer than 9,000 words.

CFP: Eliot at the American Literature Association, May 26-29, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 6:21pm
T. S. Eliot Society

CFP: Eliot at the American Literature Association

The T. S. Eliot Society will sponsor two sessions at the 2011 annual conference of the American Literature Association, May 26-29, at the Westin Copley Place in Boston. Please send proposals or abstracts (up to 250 words), along with a brief biography or curriculum vitae, to Professor Nancy K. Gish (ngish@usm.maine.edu). Submissions must be received no later than January 15, 2011.

For information on the ALA and its 2011 conference, please see http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/english/ala2.

Popmatters: Call for Papers on TV Series Past and Present

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 4:46pm
Popmatters.com

PopMatters seeks essays (1,200 to 3,000 words, typically) about any television show, present or past. (If you are interested in pitching a review of a TV show or DVD rather than a feature, please contact the appropriate editor.) We prefer careful analysis of the chosen subject matter with the intention of supporting an original thesis; we aren't particularly interested in articles that merely want to promote their subject.

Linguistics in the Gulf-3 at Qatar University

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 4:31pm
The Department of English Literature and Linguistics in the College of Arts and Sciences at Qatar University

The Department of English Literature and Linguistics in the College of Arts and Sciences at Qatar University is pleased to announce its third conference on "Linguistics in the Gulf" to be held on March 6-7, 2011.

The Conference aims to achieve the following objectives:

Vexillum: An Undergraduate Journal

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 2:43pm
Vexillum Undergraduate Journal of Classical and Medieval Studies

"Vexillum" is an undergraduate journal that supports and promotes undergraduate scholarship in the fields of Classical and Medieval Studies, and accepts scholarly essays by undergraduate students written on a wide range of topics, including but not limited to: history, literature, philosophy, archaeology, art history, sociology, philology, and linguistics. "Vexillum" provides a unique opportunity for undergraduate students to submit outstanding papers for peer review from other undergraduates, an opportunity rarely achieved in the undergraduate years.

Critical Expressivist Practices in the College Writing Classroom [500-1000 word proposals by January 15, 2011]

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 12:18pm
Roseanne Gatto & Tara Roeder, St. John's University

The term expressivism has fallen out of favor with many composition scholars in the past few decades. As social constructivist approaches to composition studies become increasingly common, the old myths about expressivism (e.g. it's solipsistic; it privileges the self over the social; it's apolitical) persist. But are the two movements actually antithetical?

[UPDATE] The Politics and Aesthetics of Global Waste (ASLE, June 21-26 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 12:12pm
Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment



The Politics and Aesthetics of Global Waste
Panel Proposal | Ninth ASLE Biennial Conference
June 21-26, 2011 | Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

Updated Abstract Deadline: October 29th, 2010

Despite pressing concerns about diminishing resources, garbage continues to accumulate in landfills, oceans, and toxic sites. Although the international waste trade is booming, those peripheral to the world economy—slumdwellers, rural poor, refugees—find themselves reduced to the status of the detritus in which they often live and work.

Rattle Journal - A Journal at the convergence of Art and Writing

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 10:22am
Rattle Journal (UK)

Call for short critical and theoretical work on Art, Writing and Visual Cultures.

Rattle is a journal of art, writing, and thought. It offers a speculative space for the text-image relationship to develop, as well as representing those moments of thought and work not easily recuperated into the mainstreams of practice.

Work may include, but is by no means limited to, theoretical and critical writing, page based artworks, reviews, fictions and poetry. We encourage the submission of interesting and unusual work regardless of its form or subject.

Proposals are welcomed but publication cannot be guaranteed before receiving finished work.

German Romanticism and its Fates in World Literature (ACLA, Vancouver, March 31-April 3, 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 12:58am
Hiroki Yoshikuni, University of Tokyo; Matthew H. Anderson, SUNY Buffalo

This seminar seeks to examine world literature in the wake of German Romanticism. German Romanticism has often been seen as a response to a philosophical crisis that emerged from Kant's formulations of theoretical and practical reason. Because, from the standpoint of theoretical reason, phenomenal nature is always "contingent" and subordinated to the laws of causality, the world of nature is, by definition, not free. But Kant also maintains that freedom, in its resistance to phenomenal desires and causes, is the unique trait or mark of a humanity that is distinguished from animals and machines, though freedom itself cannot ever appear in nature, and thus cannot be theoretically known as such.