/09
/21

displaying 1 - 15 of 18

Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 10:46pm
PAN-AFRICAN STUDIES DEPARTMENT / KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

PAN-AFRICAN STUDIES DEPARTMENT
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY
PRESENTS

"Slavery, Colonialism and African Identities in the Atlantic World"

Friday, APRIL 27, 2012
OSCAR RITCHIE HALL

MOB/RIOT CULTURE & PUBLIC PROTEST IN THE 21st CENT.

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 9:12pm
K. A. Wisniewski

CFP: MOB/RIOT CULTURE & PUBLIC PROTEST IN THE 21st CENT.

New technologies, new ways of communication, and, in some cases, new approaches to old problems and debates have emerged with the new millennium. With these changes, old tensions resurface and new conflicts arise. The past decade, and more recently in these past months, we have witnessed how these tensions create a variety of public protests and riots. This proposed collection aims to examine these acts (comparatively or individually): how and why they were initiated; how they have impacted their respective local, national, or even global communities; and how individual citizens, various groups and organizations, the media, and even governments have responded to these acts.

Troika: An Undergraduate Journal in East European, Eurasian and Slavic Studies, up till October 21

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 7:31pm
The Troika Journal

Troika is an undergraduate journal in Slavic, East European and Eurasian studies at UC Berkeley.The journal publishes outstanding undergraduate student work which may include, but is not limited to, academic research papers, creative writing, photography, artwork and memoirs.
If you would like to submit your academic work to Troika, please email it as an attachment to thetroikajournal@gmail.com, and please include your name, university, major (or intended major), and graduation

Compendium2: Writing, Teaching, and Learning in the University

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 3:51pm
Dalhousie University

The editors of Compendium2: Writing, Teaching, and Learning in the University invite contributions for online publication in the spring of 2012. Compendium2 publishes theoretical and practice-based essays that address writing development in post-secondary education. For the journal's fifth issue, we are interested in hearing from a range of disciplines, and invite submissions that consider the integration of writing and critical thinking as well as those that describe more specific assignments and teaching techniques.

U.S. Latino/a Literary Culture at CEA (11/1/2012, 3/29-31/2012)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 2:13pm
College English Association


Call for Papers: U.S. Latino/a Literary Culture at CEA 2012

March 29-31, 2012 | Richmond, Virginia

Omni Richmond Hotel, 100 South 12th Street, Richmond, Virginia
(804) 344-7000

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on U.S Latino/a Literary Culture for our 43rd annual conference. Submit your proposal at http://www.cea-web.org

Special Topics: U.S. Latino/a Literary Culture

Digital Crossroads: Media, Migration and Diaspora in a Transnational Perspective 28-30 June, 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 1:51pm
Utrecht University, the Netherlands

CALL FOR PAPERS

Conference website: http://www.digitalcrossroads.nl

Deadline for abstract submission and panel proposals: January 10, 2012

Conference chair: Sandra Ponzanesi
Conference coordinator: Fadi Hirzalla

Because of the disjunctive and unstable interplay of commerce, media, national policies, and consumer fantasies, ethnicity, once a genie contained in the bottle of some sort of locality (however large), has now become a global force, forever slipping in and through the cracks between states and borders
– Appadurai 1996, p. 41, Modernity at Large

CfP for the Edited Volume "Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind"

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 1:01pm
Alfonsina Scarinzi - Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

In his work "The Meaning of the Body" philosopher Mark Johnson argues that aesthetics is not just art theory. Rather, it should be considered to be the study of everything that goes into the human capacity to make and experience the bodily pre-linguistic cognitive, emotional and sensory-perceptual conditions of meaning constitution having its origins in the organic activities of living creatures and in their organism-environment transactions. In this way he rejects both the Kantian view of aesthetics according to which aesthetics is nonconceptual and incapable of giving rise to knowledge and the mind/body dichotomy that underlies it. Johnson introduces the embodied mind thesis into aesthetics.

Imaginary Landscapes in British Women's Writing (6/7-6/10/2012; 11/30/11)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 12:12pm
British Women Writers Conference

Imaginary Landscapes in British Women's Writing
British Women Writers Conference Panel Proposal
Conference: June 7-June 10, 2012 Boulder, CO

Paper proposals are invited for a panel-submission on imaginary or fictional landscapes in 18th- and 19th-century British women's writing. What kind of meaning or significance do these landscapes achieve? How do they achieve it? Why create such landscapes? Paper topics may include but are not limited to,
• Symbolic landscapes
• Apocalyptic landscapes
• Lyrical landscapes
• Pastoral landscapes
• Wastelands
• Utopias
• Future landscapes
• Past landscapes

Creating the Chalice: Imagination and Integrity; Biennial National Conference 2012

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 12:01pm
Association for Study of Women and Mythology

Advancing scholarship about women and mythology involves the evolution and refinement of scholarly methods. Suggested topics for this symposium might include, but are not limited to, the following:

What are new paths for the field of women's spirituality? What new models and methods support scholarly inquiry? How shall new methods be evaluated? What are criteria for solid scholarship using these new models? What are the complexities around issues of cultural appropriation? How can scholars understand and address the tensions around rootedness and local culture on the one hand, and issues of lineage and history on the other?

Pages