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ACLA 2014 (NYU) Panel: Capital Flow: Education as Exchange in Antiquity and the Renaissance (March 20-23, 2014)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 11:19pm
Claire Sommers & Luisanna Sardu/CUNY Graduate Center

Aristotle, in his Nicomachean Ethics, states that reciprocal exchange is the glue which holds society together, saying "The very existence of the state depends on proportionate reciprocity…failing which no exchange takes place, and it is exchange that binds them together…it is a duty not only to repay a service done one, but another time to take the initiative in doing a service oneself" (NE V.v.7).

Call for Special Sessions - (dis)junctions 2014

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 7:17pm
UCR (dis)junctions 2014

We are happy to begin accepting proposals for special sessions at this year's 21st annual (dis)junctions conference, on April 11-12, 2014. (dis)junctions is the interdisciplinary conference hosted by the English graduate students at UC Riverside, and is designed as a friendly forum for graduate students of all levels to introduce their latest work. Annually, we bring together graduate student scholars from across disciplines, schools, states, and countries---last year we had 29 panels, with 97 presenters from 3 countries and 20 different stats.

SHAW Postgraduate Writing Workshop

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 4:10pm
Society for the History of Women in the Americas

The Society for the History of Women in the Americas (SHAW) is hosting a writing workshop for postgraduate students on Wednesday 11th December at UCL, Institute of the Americas. The workshop is to be a forum for students to submit a piece of their writing (around 2,000 words in length) and receive feedback from fellow postgraduates and invited academics. The organisers hope to provide an informal environment in which postgrads can network and practice the defence of their thesis. The event will be free to attend and is open to postgraduate historians of all aspects of the history of the Americas.

Northern Plains Conference on Early British Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 4:09pm
St. Cloud State University

On April 4-5, 2014, St. Cloud State University will host the twenty-second annual Northern Plains Conference on Early British Literature in St. Cloud, Minnesota. The organizers invite papers on literary-critical, theoretical, and pedagogical subjects concerning texts written in Britain from the Middle Ages through the early nineteenth century. This conference has traditionally served as a venue for encouraging collaboration and the sharing of works in progress. Professor Rebecca Krug of the University of Minnesota will give the keynote address.

Please send a 250-word abstract for a twenty-minute paper to Glenn Davis (gmdavis@stcloudstate.edu) by February 3, 2014. Panel proposals are also welcome.

European Workshop on Software Ecosystems 2013 Dec 5th 2013

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 3:38pm
European Workshop on Software Ecosystems 2013 Dec 5th 2013

https://sites.google.com/site/ewseco13/home
Invitation
We would like to invite European researchers in the field of software ecosystem research to come together in Walldorf, Germany, on December 5th 2013, to discuss their recent research.
We will invite practitioners to the workshop to ensure discussion about the practical impact of research and to give the presenters the opportunity to discuss with practitioners and researchers alike.

[UPDATE] CfP Early Modern Soundscapes -- deadline 1st December 2013

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 1:34pm
Rachel Willie, Bangor University Wales UK

24th-25th April 2014, Bangor University UK.

To include the Society for Renaissance Studies 3rd Annual Welsh Lecture, given by Professor Jennifer Richards (Professor of Early Modern Literature and Culture, School of English Literature Language and Linguistics, Newcastle University) and Professor Richard Wistreich (Royal Northern College of Music).

The Difficulty of that language is not to bee conceived, and the reasons thereof are especially two:

First, because it hath no affinitie with any other that ever I heard.

Secondly, because it consisteth not so much of words and Letters, as of tunes and uncouth sounds, that no letters can expresse.

"Teaching Poe's Poetry" (ALA in Washington, D.C./ May 22-25, 2014)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 12:46pm
Poe Studies Association

For Emerson, Poe the poet was a "jingle man," a writer of lachrymose lyrics, but Baudelaire and the Symbolists venerated Poe, whom they considered a model of poetic excellence. Eliciting divergent responses during the nineteenth century, Poe's verse continues to frustrate and to intrigue readers in our time. Such divergences present opportunities for teachers, who can choose from a wide range of approaches as they introduce the poetry of Poe to students. For this panel, which will feature papers about pedagogical matters, the Poe Studies Association solicits proposals.

New Perspectives on Violence and Revolution in the African Diaspora, April 4-5, 2014

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 11:55am
Pennsylvania State University

The past several years have seen an explosion of exciting new perspectives on the subjects of race, gender, transnationalism, revolution, modernity, and colonialism. All of these themes have provided launching points for discussions and research about the lives and cultures of African-descended peoples in the diaspora. Some of the best new work on these topics is being done by advanced graduate students and scholars in the early stages of their careers.

Graduate Conference: Interpreting Appropriation/Appropriate Interpretation Feb. 28 - Mar. 2, 2014 UMass Boston

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 10:52am
Beacon: A Graduate Conference in the Humanities

The English Department of UMass Boston is pleased to announce our new annual event, Beacon: A Graduate Conference in the Humanities. For our inaugural conference, we are asking for papers that focus on the topics of interpretation and appropriation, and, in particular, how these terms intersect and interact with one another. How can we interpret appropriation? What constitutes appropriate interpretation?

Particularity in North American Lit/Crit, ACCUTE 2014 (DUE 1/11/13)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 10:26am
ACCUTE

Kwame Anthony Appiah has observed that "we expect people of a certain race to behave a certain way" due both to "the script for that identity" and "antecedent properties" that prompt the application of a given racial label. He points out that the application and subsequent performance of labels occurs not only for racial identifications, but also for all major categories within present-day identity politics. If this is indeed the case, why does it seem that the "antecedent properties" of identifications like race, gender, and, perhaps to a lesser extent, ethnicity, overwhelm more contingent identifications such as class politics, theoretical outlook, regional identification, or locality?

Particularity in North American Lit/Crit, ACCUTE 2014 (DUE 1/11/13)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 10:18am
ACCUTE

Kwame Anthony Appiah has observed that "we expect people of a certain race to behave a certain way" due both to "the script for that identity" and "antecedent properties" that prompt the application of a given racial label. He points out that the application and subsequent performance of labels occurs not only for racial identifications, but also for all major categories within present-day identity politics. If this is indeed the case, why does it seem that the "antecedent properties" of identifications like race, gender, and, perhaps to a lesser extent, ethnicity, overwhelm more contingent identifications such as class politics, theoretical outlook, regional identification, or locality?

Theorizing Space and Gender in the 21st Century--Special Topics Journal Edition

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 10:11am
Rocky Mountain MLA

The Rocky Mountain Review, the peer-reviewed journal of the Rocky Mountain Language Association, invites articles for a special issue on the topic of "space and gender." We are seeking scholarship that addresses the question of how the theorization of space informs gender studies, and how gender concerns enrich spatial studies, particularly as they intersect with literary, cultural, film, and pedagogical research. Essays may respond to, but are not limited to, the following questions: How do women, including women of color, conceptualize space, particularly hybrid, border, and marginal spaces, against a backdrop of increasing globalization in the 21st century?

WAR, WORDS AND THE WORLD: RE-PRESENTING THE GREAT WAR (26-28 FEBRUARY 2014)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 10:09am
THE CENTRE OF ADVANCED STUDY IN ENGLISH, JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY

The First World War is the first major war to have left an archive behind it. Ranging from eyewitness accounts in the trenches, to personal diaries, reportage and newsreels, propaganda, intelligence and surveillance, the material extant paints a picture not just of the conduct of hostilities from the corridors of power, but for the first time a coherent view of what organised warfare looks like from the ground. The data from recruiting centres brought to the notice of the government for the first time what the actual health status of the British public was, to the consternation of the generals, since new technologies required the carrying of heavy machinery and its operation in trying conditions.

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