/07
/30

displaying 1 - 6 of 6

From the Land of the Midnight Sun: Nordic History and Cultural Memory in Comics

updated: 
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 6:38pm
Scandinavian Journal of Comic Art

The past is all around us, not least in our entertainments. It is also a highly malleable thing that can be moulded and shaped to tell us who we are, who we should be, and where we came from. The myriad ways in which conceptions about the past can be informed by contemporary concerns and the ways the past can be used to legitimize present practices and ideas have been ably charted by scholars in the rapidly growing field of memory studies. Although highly interdisciplinary, comics studies has yet to truly enter this field, despite the fact that its subject matter provides ample opportunity for studies of representations of history and memory.

Shirley Jackson & Garlic in Fiction: (Still) Beyond the Gothic

updated: 
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 3:58pm
Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900

This proposed panel seeks to continue the conversation begun at the "Shirley Jackson: Beyond the Gothic" panel at the American Literature Association Conference in May 2014 in Washington, DC. With so much renewed attention in Jackson's work (a collection of previously unpublished works is set to be released by Random House in 2015), this panel is interested in readings of Jackson's work that go beyond the gothic or horror. The range of possible topics is broad, but of particular interest are essays that address her lesser known essays, short stories, or novels, speak to her influence on contemporary or current authors, or use emergent theoretical reading practices (i.e.

Reconceptualizing the Turn into the Twentieth Century: Critical Essays on American Literary History

updated: 
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 10:20am
Meredith Goldsmith/Melanie Dawson

Despite the substantial reconceptualization of the field of American literature in recent decades, century-based constructs typically remain in place throughout the field, particularly in relation to "nineteenth-century American literature" versus "twentieth-century American literature." Courses are taught, textbooks sold, and academic jobs are constructed around such distinctions. Such logic particularly limits scholarship on the turn into the twentieth century, often characterized as a midpoint on a teleological trajectory culminating in literary modernism.

Writers and bloggers wanted for arts magazine

updated: 
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 7:41am
The New Union

Issue 3 of The New Union is now available to read online (www.new-union.co.uk) We are now looking for contributions for our fourth issue, which will be published at the end of October 2014. If you have something you would like to contribute, please send it to editors@new-union.co.uk by Friday 17 October 2014.

Do you want to promote and defend the value of the arts and humanities? If so, why not contribute to The New Union by writing for us. We are currently on the look out for interesting and powerful articles that reflect the importance of the arts and humanities in the twenty-first century.