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CFP Medieval Monsters and Their Afterlives (9/15/17; Kalamazoo 5/10-13/18)

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:07am
Michael A Torregrossa / Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Past, Present, Future: Medieval Monsters and Their Afterlives
Sponsored by The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan
10-13 May 2018
Proposals due by 15 September 2017

Kalamazoo 2018: History and Poetics (with Suzanne Akbari)

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:06am
Harvard English Dept. Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

This panel focuses on medieval conceptions of time, history, and memory. As literary historians, we frequently encounter the challenges of periodization: how to establish the autonomous significance of the Middle Ages, as well as think beyond the limits of stage-oriented historiography. Yet how did medieval chroniclers, poets, artists, and travellers view the historical process and their place within it? What “pasts” did they recover, and what forms of representation were used to remember, rehearse or reimagine them? Are there distinctions drawn between history and memory—between notionally universal, stable, and textual forms of record, and personal, bodily, and mutable ones?

Kalamazoo 2018: Literary Personae, Translating Identity (with Leslie Lockett)

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:06am
Harvard English Dept. Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Literary personae often operate as sites of negotiation between historical identity and literary or intellectual-historical traditions. Personae such as the didactic interlocutor, the dreamer, the lamenting lyric speaker, or the scop reoccur in certain medieval genres; these figures, however, are also often marked by particular cultural or biographical features, differentiating them from others in the tradition. This panel welcomes papers that discuss literary personae in Anglo-Saxon England from any angle, but which might respond to one or several of the following questions. What types of performance are involved in the assumption of literary personae?

Philosophy and the American Renaissance (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 11:06am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

In Moby-Dick, Ahab, the monomaniacal captain of the Pequod, famously iterates the following lines: “Hark ye yet again,—the little lower layer. All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event—in the living act, the undoubted deed—there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask!” In this instance, Ahab might be seen as possessed by what John Dewey called philosophy’s endless “quest for certainty.” Thus, Ahab’s monomaniacal discourse can be said to turn on the appearance/reality distinction—a dichotomy germane to Western metaphysics since Plato.

Twenty Years after 'The Savage Detectives': On the Legacy of Roberto Bolaño (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:32pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Commemorating the 20th anniversary of the publication of Roberto Bolaño's novel, The Savage Detectives, we want to address the legacy of this Latin American author. We intend to discuss Bolaño's status in world literature today, as a "local" voice that was never very local, to begin with (he was a Chilean who produced most of his work in Mexico and Spain, and who included cosmopolitan references in all of his stories), but has certainly become "global" in the 21st century. Papers in English and Spanish will be considered. 

Tales of the Border: Migration Narratives and Border Studies in the Trump Era (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:32pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Donald Trump's election as President of the United States on an openly anti-immigrant, and indeed anti-Mexican, platform constitutes a challenge for the field of border studies: What is border culture when the leader of the most powerful country in the world insists on closing the border? This panel aims to map the current state of the discourse(s) on and from the U.S.-Mexico border, including literature, film, journalism, and music. Papers in English and Spanish will be considered. 

Composition as Big Data

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:32pm
Amanda Licastro and Ben Miller
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Please consider submitting a proposal for the following edited collection. Feel free to share widely (with apologies for cross-posting).

This edited collection, currently under consideration, will serve as a research and methods guide for practitioners interested in conducting large-scale data-driven examinations of student writing.

Global Wars, Local Traumas (Panel NeMLA Convention 2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 9:01pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Abstracts for papers are requsted for the panel "Global Wars, Local Traumas" at the 49th NeMLA Annual Convention (April 12-15, 2018) Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Panel Title: Global Wars, Local Traumas

New Perspectives in Science Education, 7th edition - International Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - 10:18am
NPSE / Pixel
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 15, 2018

The 7th edition of the New Perspectives in Science Education Conference will take place in Florence, Italy, on 22 - 23 March 2018.

The objective of the New Perspectives in Science Education Conference is to promote transnational cooperation and share good practice in the field of innovation for science education. The New Perspectives in Science Education Conference is also an excellent opportunity for the presentation of previous and current projects in the science field.

The Call for Papers, within the New Perspective in Science Education Conference, is addressed to teachers, researchers and experts in the field of science education as well as to coordinators of science and training projects.

Neo-Victorian Series (Brill/Rodopi)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:29pm
Dr Marie-Luise Kohlke / Swansea University (Wales, UK)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 15, 2017

The Series Editors of Brill/Rodopi’s Neo-Victorian Series (http://www.brill.com/products/series/neo-victorian-series) invite proposals for future edited collections in the series, to map emergent, prominent, and critically underrepresented strands of neo-Victorian literature and culture. In particular, we would welcome themed proposals on the following subjects:

 

•           Neo-Victorian Ecologies & Environmental Ethics

•           Neo-Victorian Cosmopolitanism

•           Neo-Victorian Postcolonialities

•           Neo-Victorian Journeys and Travels

•           Neo-Victorian Geographies

“Staging Knowledge in Early English Drama” Kalamazoo 2018

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:28pm
Joe Stadolnik and Helen Cushman
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

In late-medieval England, public performances of learning and expertise were political performances, that not only expressed one’s mastery of a subject but also an ability and right to speak to it in public view. Whether speaking to knowledge of theology, or medicine, or carpentry, these public professions of knowledge were subject to scrutiny both institutional (e.g. the Church or craft guilds) and informal (by lay churchgoers or prospective customers). Drama offered a form in which claims to knowledge could be exaggerated, parodied, or reproduced for effect--in a word, staged--to invite medieval audiences to rethink the social and political dimensions to such performances.

CfP NeMLA 18: Keeping it Real in the Age of Post-postmodernism (Roundtable)

updated: 
Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 1:58pm
NorthEast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Postmodernism is clearly dead—its death and what follows it have been theorized in a myriad of different ways, most recently perhaps by the special edition of Twentieth Century Literature entitled Postmodern/Postwar—And After in the spring of 2016. The advancements of digital technology and the pressing need to look beyond the human and onto a planetary scale of existence are frequent explanations for recent shifts in literary and cultural production. But what explains the resurgence of novels written in the realist mode?

New Approaches to Bob Dylan

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:28pm
University of Southern Denmark
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, March 1, 2018

Bob Dylan's songs have been the subject of countless close readings and interpretations. Philological research has identified many of the literary sources for Dylan’s lyrics. His songs have been studied in relation to the ballad tradition, romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism. Dylan’s revisionary approaches to what it means to be a poet have also been widely discussed. Drawing on the occasion of Dylan’s recent Nobel Prize, this conference seeks to open up new avenues and different approaches to his songs.

We are especially interested in the following topics:

Attachment and Attunement

Population, Ecology and the Malthusian Imagination

updated: 
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - 3:27pm
Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Overpopulation has become the ‘third rail’ of contemporary environmentalism: no major organization wants to touch the issue anymore. While it had been one of the driving concerns of early environmentalism up until the 1970s, exemplified by such seminal texts as Fairfield Osborn’s Our Plundered Planet (1948), Paul Ehrlich’s The Population Bomb (1968), and the Club of Rome’s The Limits of Growth (1972), concern with population control has since dropped off the list of popular environmentalist causes.