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Extrapolation, Interdisciplinarity, and Learning: The Second Annual City Tech Symposium on Science Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:28pm
Jason Ellis at New York City College of Technology, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Extrapolation, Interdisciplinarity, and Learning: The Second Annual City Tech Symposium on Science Fiction

 

Date:                Wednesday, December 6, 2017

 

Location:         New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay St., Namm N119,

                        Brooklyn, NY

 

            Knowledge is indivisible. When people grow wise in one direction, they are sure to make it easier for themselves to grow wise in other directions as well. On the other hand, when they split up knowledge, concentrate on their own field, and scorn and ignore other fields, they grow less wise—even in their own field.

Bibliographical Society of America 2018 Fellowship Program

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:28pm
The Bibliographical Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 1, 2017

The Bibliographical Society of America is pleased to announce its 2018 Fellowship Program.

 

The BSA Fellowship Committee wishes to remind our broad community that BSA awards are open to any member of the scholarly community engaged in bibliographical scholarship, including: academics, faculty, graduate students, booksellers, collectors, and scholars studying the materiality of books, manuscripts, and other cultural documents and artifacts. 

 

Multimodal Books as Archives (CFP for Narrative Conference 2018)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:28pm
Torsa Ghosal and Brian Davis
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 5, 2017

Title of the panel to be proposed: Multimodal Books as Archives

Conference: 2018 International Conference on Narrative

 

Where: McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Dates: April 19 – 22, 2018.

 

Co-chairs: Torsa Ghosal (California State University, Sacramento) and Brian Davis (University of Maryland, College Park)

 

ACLA 2018: "The Return of Generic Criticism"

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

Recent scholarship in literary studies has witnessed a return to an otherwise perennially unfashionable topic: genre. Also the subject of the 2009 English Institute and subsequent volume The Work of Genre (2011), this proliferation of novel theoretical and historical approaches to genre has taken several forms. Whereas scholars like Wai Chee Dimock have worked to disentangle theories of genre from a rigidly synchronic historicism, other critics—for example, Virginia Jackson with lyric and Elaine Freedgood with the realist novel—have sought to foreground genre as fundamentally historical.

Deadline Extended: NeMLA 2018 Classics Today

updated: 
Monday, October 2, 2017 - 9:53pm
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 10, 2017

The art, history, literature, and philosophy of ancient Greece and Rome serve as the foundation of Western civilization. While the Classics have had a tremendous influence on subsequent cultures, the academy frequently keeps the discipline of Classics separate from modern literatures and languages. Yet the Classics have always been an integral part of cultural productions and the university itself; the word “academy” even has its origins in Plato. This roundtable will explore the current state of Classics scholarship, focusing on Classics as an area of study as well as its place in contemporary academia. Possible approaches include:
· Defining the Classics

· Current research trends in Classics scholarship

NeMLA 2018 Going Places from Pastoral to Polis: Setting and Fiction in Antiquity and Beyond

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

The ancient Greek word topos is commonly translated as “place” and referred to a region, site, or geographical position. While the ancient Greek language is long gone, the term topos has survived and passed into the modern vernacular. Today, the word topos is used in literary theory and refers to any common literary theme or motif. This passage of the term for “place” into literary analysis is the natural extension of how the Classics viewed space, as they defined their world through fictions and mythology. The flora and fauna found in the pastoral realm had their origins in various myths, while the city gave the temple a central location and tie its central civic and religious festival to theatre.

"Escape and its Discontents" at ACLA 2018

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
ACLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

ACLA Conference 2018: March 29-April 1, Los Angeles

The ACLA's annual conferences have a distinctive structure in which most papers are grouped into twelve-person seminars that meet two hours per day for three days of the conference to foster extended discussion. Some eight-person (or smaller) seminars meet just the first two days of the conference. 

CFP for Seminar: "Escape and its Discontents"

Deadline extended: Seminar: Literatures and/of Waste

updated: 
Wednesday, October 25, 2017 - 3:44pm
Louisville Conference on Literature & Culture Since 1900
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 2, 2017

Themes of waste and waste management circulate in contemporary literature as demonstrated in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, the scatological poetry of A.R. Ammons, the collages of James Schuyler and Rachel Blau DuPlessis, and the language middens of Caroline Bergvall’s Drift. Collections like Jennifer Scappettone’s The Republic of Exit 43 also highlight the shared architecture of landfills and human bodies connected by waste, built environments, and literary corpuses. The purpose of the seminar is then twofold. First, this seminar invites participants to explore art, film, and literature through the lens of waste, waste management, and toxic materialism.

UPDATE: Imagining Other Worlds: Setting in Early Modern English Drama

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
Philip Goldfarb Styrt/Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Every play imagines its own world—but the worlds they imagine must in some way connect with their audience, both past and present. This panel invites perspectives on early modern English drama that considers the balance between these two poles: the imagined world of the setting and its connection to the surrounding culture in early modern England. This balance is particularly important in early modern English drama for both historical reasons—an increased awareness of other worlds and their different reality within the expanding cultural purview of the early modern English—and literary ones—since so much criticism of these plays has focused on their relation to early modern England itself to the exclusion of their frequently quite disparate settings.

Travel and Literature at CEA 2018

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
College English Association, Travel and Literature Area
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Call for Papers: Travel and Literature at CEA 2018

April 5-7 | Saint Petersburg, Florida

Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront | 333 1st St. South, Saint Petersburg, Florida  33701 | Phone: (727) 894-5000

 

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on Travel and Literature for our 49th annual conference.  Submit your proposal at www.cea-web.org.

Economics and SF

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
Vector
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, March 31, 2018

How does SF represent and reflect on economic life?

How do finance, value, exchange, production, and the everyday economic reality of people’s lives appear in SF? How might SF contribute to the ongoing evolution of economics? And what might creators of science fiction, as custodians of radical visions of social organisation, learn from economics at this critical moment?

Frankenstein 1818 to 2018: 200 Years of Mad Scientists and Monsters: A First Call for Papers

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
Michael A Torregrossa / The Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 1, 2018

Frankenstein 1818 to 2018:

200 Years of Mad Scientists and Monsters

A First Call for Papers

 

The Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association seeks proposals for papers and/or complete sessions to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in 1818 and to celebrate the longevity of her iconic characters of scientist Victor Frankenstein, “the pale student of unhallowed arts,” and his monstrous construct, “the thing he had put together,” as she succinctly describes them in her introduction to the 1831 reissue of the work.