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displaying 1 - 14 of 14

Tolkien's Legendarium and Medieval Cosmology

updated: 
Friday, July 13, 2018 - 11:33am
Judy Ann Ford, Texas A&M Univ–Commerce
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 14, 2018

The assumption that science largely ceased to be an area of human endeavor between the Hellenistic period and the age of Galileo has given way to an increasing awareness of the continuity of scientific thinking throughout the medieval period, especially as regards cosmology and astronomy. The notion of a more scientifically aware Middle Ages may seem at odds with the boundaries of medieval thought presented in the paradigms of western medievalism created by authors C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien. But the popular image of the Middle Ages they created may be less incompatible with recent work on medieval science than might initially be supposed.

The World of Bob Dylan

updated: 
Friday, July 13, 2018 - 12:23pm
The University of Tulsa Institute for Bob Dylan Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

In 2016, the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa jointly announced the acquisition of the Bob Dylan Archive–an extraordinary collection of material that includes over 6,000 items, including recordings, manuscripts, film, notebooks and much more.  These materials have already begun to open up new ways of understanding not just Dylan and his work, but the broader history of popular music both in America and around the world.  Tulsa is already home to the Woody Guthrie Center and will soon welcome OKPOP, which will house collections related to Leon Russell, Wanda Jackson, Roy Clark, Bob Wills, and more.  The Bob Dylan Archive will thus rest at the center of a rich array of resources focused o

Parenting While Academic: Issues of Childcare in the Early Academic Career (Roundtable)

updated: 
Friday, July 13, 2018 - 11:29am
John Brick / Marquette University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Insensitivity to the demands of childcare is nowhere explicitly codified in any academic department or organization, but the formal structures and informal customs of the modern academic organization produce a bias that disproportionately affects the most vulnerable members of the academic hierarchies. Scholarship and childcare compete for time and attention. Extracurricular expectations — conference travel, participation in departmental committees, archival research, interviews & campus visits, &c. — take on new dimensions of difficulty. Graduate stipends and adjunct pay are prohibitively inadequate for the costs of having and raising children, even when supplemented with secondary incomes.

CFP (SEA 19): Teaching early American lit to teachers & in high schools

updated: 
Friday, July 13, 2018 - 12:23pm
Patrick M. Erben/Society of Early Americanists
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Call for Papers: Society of Early Americanists 2019 Biennial Conference

February 27-March 3, 2019 in Eugene, Oregon

Panel 1) Teaching Teachers How to Teach Early American Literature

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Panel 2) Teaching Early American Literature in High Schools

Songs of Innocence and of Experiential Learning

updated: 
Friday, July 13, 2018 - 11:25am
Jesse Miller (Northeast Modern Langauge Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Experiential Learning has been described as an innovative approach to pedagogy in the fields of literature, language, and composition. Proponents argue that integrating Experiential Learning opportunities such as public projects, the production of publications, partnerships with local organizations, volunteering, and field trips into the curriculum enable students to connect what they've learned in the classroom to the wider world. But the significance of the concept of experience in the scholarship on experiential learning, although far from self-evident, remains largely untheorized. In Songs of Experience, Martin Jay points out that in modern philosophy the concept of experience has taken on a range of meanings, sometimes to conflicting ends.

" Victorian Fun, Amusement and Delight," For the Humanities Congress at the University of British Columbia, June 1-7th, 2019

updated: 
Friday, July 13, 2018 - 12:22pm
VSAO-Sponsored ACCUTE Joint Session
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

From Edward Lear’s owl-and-pussycat elopement, the Queen’s laughable rage in Wonderland, to the visual wit found in illustrations by Phiz and the Punch artists, the Victorian era was no stranger to delight and merry-making. In one sense, the Victorian era was a bastion of prudish puritanical “no nonsense,” of earnest rationalism in its documenting positivism and nascent naturalist sciences. In another sense, this historic moment also saw the flowering of imaginative merriment through the emergence of leisure time for working and bourgeois classes, which inspired a myriad of humorous and nonsense artistic forms to proliferate.

Questioning Italian Romanticism: Foscolo, Leopardi and Manzoni in debate (NeMLA)

updated: 
Friday, July 13, 2018 - 11:24am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The classical-romantic debate (1816-1826) was a crucial moment for the definition of modern Italian literature. Ugo Foscolo, Giacomo Leopardi and Alessandro Manzoni, while taking part in the discussion, express some of the key aspects of their poetics. These three authors, some of the most important in Italian literature, were deeply influenced by the debate; at the same time, they claimed their original positions, which are not completely identifiable as either Classicist or Romantic. Indeed, sometimes scholars have, for example, unduly classified Leopardi as a Romantic, even though he thought of himself as a Classicist.

"Place and Placelessness": The 15th International F. Scott Fitzgerald Society Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, July 11, 2018 - 9:11am
The F. Scott Fitzgerald Society
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2019

The F. Scott Fitzgerald Society will host its 15th international conference, "Place and Placelessness," in Toulouse, France, from June 24-29, 2019, with an optional pre-conference meeting date in Paris on June 23 to tour significant Fitzgerald sites. 

Animals and Materiality in the Arthurian Tradition (Sponsored by the Centre for Arthurian Studies at Bangor University)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 17, 2018 - 1:24pm
Renée Ward, University of Lincoln
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 31, 2018

We seek papers to compose a session sponsored by the Centre for Arthurian Studies at Bangor University. The session will include 3 or 4 papers on the subject of “Animals and Materiality in the Arthurian Tradition” for the 2019 International Medieval Congress at Leeds. The Congress theme is “Materialities.”