Feminist War Games? Mechanisms of War, Feminist Values, and Interventional Games

deadline for submissions: 
September 15, 2018
full name / name of organization: 
Jon Saklofske
contact email: 

Call for Contributors!

Feminist War Games? Mechanisms of War, Feminist Values, and Interventional Games

An edited volume

 

Most commercial digital games that feature warfare idealize such conflict, rendering it as a fun activity by rewarding competitive acts of virtual violence. Such idealizing processes continue to validate war as something desirable and worthwhile.  This project explores the critical intersections and collisions between feminist values and habits/perceptions of war by asking whether feminist values can be asserted as interventional approaches to the design, play and analysis of games that focus on armed conflict and economies of violence.

 

Exploring the compatibility between feminist values and systems of war through video games is a unique way to pose destabilizing questions, solutions, and approaches; to prototype alternative narratives; and to challenge current idealizations and assumptions.  Feminist values can be asserted as a critical method of design, as an ideological design influence, and as a lens that determines how designers and players interact with/within arenas of war. 

 

A timely volume, this project addresses and questions the often toxic nature of online and gaming cultures, the persistence and brutality of war, and the potential and power of feminist perspectives and values in relation to media studies, issues surrounding violence in video games,and the place and purpose of digital games in our cultural moment.

 

We invite contributions for this edited volume that aims to bring together scholars and makers from a variety of disciplines to discuss conflicts and questions at the intersection of feminism, war, and digital games.  We welcome theoretical papers, philosophical musings, stories, case studies, close readings, textual play-throughs, and creations.  Written contributions should be 3000-6000 words in length.

 

Chapter proposal (abstracts) of  250-500 words (together with a short biography of the author(s)) should be sent to Jon Saklofske (jon.saklofske@acadiau.ca) and Alyssa Arbuckle (alyssaa@uvic.ca) no later than 15 September 2018. Authors will be notified of the selection outcome by 30 September 2018.  Full chapters will be due 31 November 2018.  The book proposal for this project has already been submitted for consideration to Routledge.  Please address any questions to one or both above-listed editors.