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Call for Bookbird Issue 57.3 (July 2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:54am
Petros Panaou
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Special issue on children’s literature originally published in a language other than English

Academic Articles, ca. 4000 words

Call for Bookbird Issue 57.2 (Apr 2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:54am
Petros Panaou
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

Open-themed Issue

Bookbird is inviting submissions in all categories (academic articles; letters; postcards; children and their books; authors and their books). Full papers should be submitted to the editors, Petros Panaou (ppanaou@uga.edu) and Janelle Mathis (janelle.mathis@unt.edu) by October 1, 2018. For further information, please visit the Bookbird website at http://www.ibby.org/bookbird.

Call for Bookbird Issue 57.1 (Jan 2019)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:54am
Petros Panaou
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Negotiating Agency, Voice and Identity through Literature

Bookbird seeks contributions for a themed issue on agency, voice and identity. In a fast-changing world, where power is becoming more and more oppressive and undemocratic, agency, voice and identity are the very life elements that can sustain us. Our sense of agency—our ability to assert our identity, exert our voice and make a difference in the world—is closely related to our drive to live, act and hope. Citizens who contribute to, and receive from, their local and global communities, strive to have a voice in issues that matter and to be part of decision-making processes that are of importance. Such empowerment comes from developing a strong sense of identity.

CFP: Capture Japan – Visual Culture and the Global Imagination from 1952 to the Present

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:51am
Loughborough University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

Contributions are now being accepted for a new edited book titled ‘Capture Japan: Visual Culture and the Global Imagination from 1952 to the Present’. The book aims to analyse, deconstruct and challenge representations of Japan in a variety of different visual media such as cinema, documentary film, photography, visual art, anime, manga, comics, television or advertising. Through a series of case studies by an international group of experts in the field, the book will highlight the institutional framework that has allowed certain types of images of Japan to be promoted, while others have been suppressed.

Reminder: “Mementos and the Nineteenth-Century Marriage Plot”

updated: 
Wednesday, September 5, 2018 - 8:17pm
2019 Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Call for Papers, “Mementos and the Nineteenth-Century Marriage Plot” for “Monuments and Memory,” INCS 2019 (March 21-24, 2019 in Dallas, TX)

Please submit a 250-word abstract by September 5, 2018 to Catherine J. Golden at cgolden@skidmore.edu and Melissa Rampelli at mrampelli@holyfamily.edu

Poetics and Politics of Translation and Rewriting in Early Modern Literature in English (Northeast Modern Language Association 50th Anniversary Convention)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:48am
Emiliano Gutierrez Popoca/ Brandeis University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The achievements of Early Modern literature in English evince the relevance of translation for literary history. The impact of translation on the development of new literary modes and genres during this period is often acknowledged. It is clear, for instance, that the sonnet in English, both as a verse form and as a mode of individual lyrical expression, is traced to its introduction to the English tradition through Wyatt and Surrey’s translations of Petrarch’s Canzoniere.

In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

updated: 
Friday, July 27, 2018 - 1:09pm
The Renaissance Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 12, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.  

REMINDER: Bridging the Gap? Digital Media in the Humanities Classroom (special issue of Interdisciplinary Humanities)

updated: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 11:12am
Cameron McFarlane and Kristin Lucas, Nipissing University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Recent critical focus on media and technology maps efforts to create a dynamic classroom that at its best enriches the teaching and learning at the university. But the long-standing interest in media as a means to reach students and enhance delivery also points to an absence in current scholarship, which has not been attentive to that same media as content in the humanities classroom.

 

Henry Roth: The Novel at the Periphery

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:02am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

50th NeMLA Anniversary Convention Washington, DC | March 21-24, 2019

Special Issue 'American Literary Naturalism in the World'

updated: 
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 - 9:01am
CR: The New Centennial Review (Michigan State UP)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Essays are invited for a forthcoming special issue of the CR on American literary naturalism in a global context. As Christopher Hill has argued in “The Travels of Naturalism and the Challenges of a World Literary History,” the history of nineteenth-century naturalist fiction points to disorderly patterns of circulation that suggest “multiple, overlapping histories, together forming a heterogeneous history on the scale of the planet.” Using the concept of “travel” as his point of reference, Hill sees naturalism as a paradigm for thinking about transnational literary, cultural, and economic transformations.

Metaphoric Stammers and Embodied Speakers (Conference)

updated: 
Monday, July 23, 2018 - 11:08am
Maria Stuart, Assistant Professor, School of English, Drama and Film, University College Dublin
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 30, 2018

Metaphoric Stammers and Embodied Speakers: Expanding the Borders of Dysfluency Studies (Humanities Institute, University College Dublin, 12 October, 2018)

 Keynote speaker: Chris Eagle, Emory University, Centre for the Study of Human Health (Dysfluencies: On Speech Disorders in Modern Literature, 2014; Talking Normal: Literature, Speech Disorders, and Disability, ed. 2013)

Navigating Trauma: Pasts, Presents, and Futures in African American Literature (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Friday, September 28, 2018 - 5:08pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

NeMLA Annual Convention - Washington D.C. - 21-24 March, 2019

In “Further Considerations on Afrofuturism”, Kodwo Eshun argued that the impact of the Middle Passage and slavery could still be felt in African American authorship today. The erasure of their African past, culture and heritage leaving them disconnected and made strangers, black writers look to the future as a way of dealing and engaging with the present. The term counterfutures is thus used to describe those writings that explore the potentiality of a dissonant life that emerges from these traumas, ones which reimagine the futures that the current path of human experience seems to lead to, as well as the pasts that have or might catalyze real or imagined futures.

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