New Monstrosities: New Approaches to 19th-Century Monsters

deadline for submissions: 
November 15, 2018
full name / name of organization: 
Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE)
contact email: 

ACCUTE Member-Organized Panel: New Monstrosities: New Approaches to 19th-Century Monsters

Panel Organizers: Alicia Alves and Lin Young

Congress, University of British Columbia, June 1-4, 2019

 

From Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Bram Stoker’s Dracula, the nineteenth century is bursting with visions of the monstrous. Monsters lurked in hidden spaces of cities, in art and illustration, and in the pages of fiction and journalism. The nineteenth century conceived of monstrosity in bodily form, but also interpreted various practices as monstrous in and of themselves, such as perceived moral degeneracy or non-normative sexualities. This panel seeks papers that offer fresh critical perspectives on monstrosities in various forms throughout the nineteenth century.

 

Possible paper topics might include:

  • Queer, feminist, anti-colonialist perspectives on fear and/or monsters
  • Domestic/anti-domestic monsters; places of haunting/terror
  • Neo-Romantic, Neo-Gothic or Neo-Victorian monsters and fear
  • Titillation and terror in pulp genres, including science fiction, fantasy, crime fiction and/or penny dreadfuls
  • Representations of classic monsters such as vampires, werewolves, or ghosts, versus more pervasive social ‘monsters,’ such as rakes, degenerates, libertines, etc.
  • Modes of the supernatural, magic, and ‘unnatural’ power
  • Representations of monsters in art, advertisements, photography, or other visual mediums
  • Representations of technology, industry, or innovation as consciously/unconsciously monstrous

 

Please submit paper proposals by November 15, 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form available here: https://accute.ca/accute-conference/proposal-submission-form/. In your submission, please include a 300-500-word proposal without personal identifying marks, a 100-word abstract, and a 50-word bio.