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CFP: How Higher Education Should Respond to Fake News and the Post-Truth World

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2018 - 12:04pm
Sherry Jones, The Liminal: Interdisciplinary Journal of Technology in Education
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

The Liminal: Interdisciplinary Journal of Technology in Education (LIJTE), University of Denver Digital Commons

Journal Website: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/theliminal/
CFP document: http://bit.ly/liminalcfp20181

Deadline for Submissions

First Call for Submission: December 1, 2018

Second Call for Submissions: January 15, 2019
Revisions Due: March 15, 2019

Of Entrepreneurial Castaways and Overflowing Passions: 300 Years of Defoe's Robinson Crusoe and Haywood's Love in Excess

updated: 
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 - 6:28pm
Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 15, 2019

 

Of Entrepreneurial Castaways and Overflowing Passions:

300 Years of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe

and Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess

 

An International Conference

13 and 14 May, 2019

Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, UNAM

Mexico City

 

Summary

Forming the Future

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2018 - 12:03pm
David Sergeant / University of Plymouth
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Forming the Future

 

Confirmed keynotes: Amy J. Elias (Tennessee, Knoxville); Daniel Innerarity (Ikerbasque); Sandra Kemp (Lancaster/Imperial)

 

University of Plymouth, UK; Sept. 2nd(p.m.) and 3rd, 2019.

 

Redefining Epic, Romance and Novel in Italian Culture (CAIS 2019 Orvieto, Italy)

updated: 
Monday, November 26, 2018 - 12:02pm
Lucia Gemmani (University of Iowa), Andrea Privitera (University of Western Ontario, Università di Padova)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, February 28, 2019

This panel seeks to continue the fruitful dialogue about the intertwining of epic, romance and novel in Italian culture we started at the AAIS-CSIS 2017 Conference in Columbus, Ohio. In order to further the scholarship of Bakhtin, Jameson, Doody, and Fusillo among others, we welcome investigations of the widespread presence and reciprocal influence of these three literary forms in the Italian linguistic and cultural space from the Middle Ages to the present day. What motivates their contaminations? What emerges from the collisions of these different styles and worldviews within the Italian context?