displaying 46 - 60 of 1937

Engaging Difference: Supporting LD, ELL, First-in-family and Other Exceptional Learners

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:06pm
NeMLA, March 2019, Washington D.C.
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In typical college classrooms, instructors face large groups of highly diverse students. In fact, students are often so diverse that even their diversity is diverse. Differences in educational background, family support systems, English-language proficiency, abilities and disabilities, and more, can strongly impact students' capacities to fulfill course expectations.

But while "differentiation" has become a pervasive buzzword within K-12 pedagogy, in higher education it remains unclear exactly how, where, when, and whose responsibility it is to engage and support students with various learning challenges.

Truth in Documentary and Docufiction: Images of Transnational Realities

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:06pm
Caroline Wakaba Futamura / NeMLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Although the term “documentary” with respect to film was not coined until 1926 by John Grierson, precursors to this genre have existed for ethnographic purposes from the late-nineteenth century. Defined by Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary as “a presentation (such as a film or novel) expressing or dealing with factual events: a documentary presentation,” this cinematographic form, even from its very inception, has been grappling with the hybrid version, docu-fiction. This latter genre, a combination of seemingly mutually exclusive elements—objective factual and subjective fictional—seems to undermine the very essence of what constitutes documentary cinema.

NeMLA 2019 Panel: Activism, Advocacy, and the Archive

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:06pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

While historical and literary archives have long been integral to the study of the humanities, they are more than simple repositories for historical artifacts. They don’t just preserve works and fragments to be studied, they help us, as scholars, to actively engage in the public sphere. As Randall C. Jimerson notes “Archivists can use the power of archives to promote accountability, open government, diversity, and social justice.” In doing so, archivists can democratize information and open up new avenues of knowing by employing ethical and objective—but not neutral—strategies. This can be especially important for subjugated communities, who’s histories and cultures have been bound and kept distinct.

South Asian Fiction in English

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:06pm
Dr. Susmita Roye
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

South Asian Fiction in English

 

This panel is proposed for Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) convention at Washington DC in March 2019.

 

This panel proposes to explore South Asian Fiction in English in all its aspects. Topics may include but are not limited to:

 

South Asia in North America

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:05pm
Dr. Susmita Roye
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

South Asia in North America

 

This panel is proposed for Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) convention at Washington DC in March 2019.

In tune with the 2019 NeMLA convention theme of “Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples”, this proposed panel aims to draw more scholarly focus on the theme of diversity and cultural interactions in the US. People from all around the world emigrate to the US and Canada, enriching their cultural texture. This panel will particularly concentrate on the immigrants from South Asia.

 

Some of the topics that it hopes to address are:

Political and Aesthetic Entanglements in French Antillean Cultural Expression

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:35pm
Lisa Connell/ NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The Caribbean basin has long been theorized as a crossroads of multiple political, cultural, environmental, and social influences. Within the specific context of the French Antilles, the 1946 act of departmentalization has served to increase the region’s ambiguous political and cultural status. Indeed, many French Caribbean artists, activists, and writers have staged, questioned, and probed the ramifications of these multiple epistemological points of contact.

The Wakandan Civitas and its Panthering Futurity

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:36pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Black Panther ventures Afrotopic advancement and this panel engages receptions of Black civilization as literary form (i.e. reading film, graphic novel, etc. as text) in order to create dialogue generally about various aspects of African and African diasporic representation. This panel reviews and welcomes both ideal and/or dystopic civilizational interpretives.  Papers should endeavor various facets seen on screen as text and how it reveals connectivity from or to a Black past particularly locating eutopic notions that counter or embellish traditionalized (and/or sexualized, racialized, classized) gazes. We encourage submission that read rendering notions of race, class, gender, intelligence, civilizations, colonialisms, etc.

Anxious Masculinity in the American Drama

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:19pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

"This game is seven card stud." -- A Streetcar Named Desire.

"I get so lonely….I get the feeling that…I won’t be making a living for you, or a business, a business for the boys." -- Death of a Salesman

Music in Literature, NeMLA 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:19pm
Julia Titus, Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

A multidisciplinary research focusing on the complex interrelationship of music and literature has expanded rapidly in the recent years. There are numerous examples in European and American literatures, both in poetry and prose, where music plays a vital rolе (Leo Tolstoy, Chekhov, Proust, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Apollinaire, George Eliot, Henry James, and many others), and while there has been many published studies focusing on the formal relationship between the sister arts of music and literature (Steven Paul Scher “Literature and Music,” Werner Woft “The Musicalization of Fiction,” Delia de Souza Correa “George Eliot, Music and Victorian Culture”), there has not been much research focused specifically on music or musical performance within the text.

Aesthetics of Gentrification

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:35pm
SLOW LAB (University of Oregon, College of Design)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 8, 2018

Aesthetics of Gentrification: Art, Architecture, and Displacement

 

International Conference

University of Oregon in Portland

April 5-6, 2019

 

Organized by the University of Oregon SLOW LAB, this interdisciplinary conference brings together scholars from across the humanities, social sciences, and art and design fields to explore the aesthetic dimensions of gentrification in the present era of accelerated urbanism.

WITCHCRAFT HYSTERIA. Performing witchcraft in contemporary art and pop culture.

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:36am
Katharina Brandl and Johanna Braun / University of California, Los Angeles and University of Basel
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

We seem to be living in bewitched times. Witches are everywhere in pop culture, and we're also seeing victims of alleged "witch hunts" pop up all over the place, especially on Twitter and other social media. Pop-stars perform as witches: like Katy Perry in her performance at the 2014 Grammy awards, where she appeared in a cowl before a crystal ball, while later dancing with broomsticks as poles. Beyoncé’s visual album “Lemonade” (2016) made several explicit references to the historical figure Marie Laveau and magical witchcraft rituals drawn from Yoruba traditions.

Representations of Class Intersectionality (ACLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:37pm
ACLA 2019 // March 7th-10th // Georgetown University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Representations of Class Intersectionality

ACLA 2019 — March 7th - 10th

Georgetown University, Washington DC

Critical Fashion & Luxury at NeMLA 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:16pm
nigel lezama, brock university
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Jen Sweeney (Bard College), Nigel Lezama (Brock University) & Jess Clark (Brock University) are co-organizing a small series of critical fashion and luxury studies interventions and events at NeMLA in Washington, DC, from March 21 to 24, 2019. We are seeking 200-word proposals from speakers for the following panel and round table:

Power Dressing: Counter-Hegemonic Practices in Fashion And Luxury

Capitalizing on Fashion and Luxury Studies and Practices: A Roundtable Discussion

For more info, click here: https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/2097159/fashion-inte...

NeMLA 2019 Panel: The Future of Trauma Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 8:25am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This pre-approved panel seeks scholars to present at the 2019 NeMLA conference (March 21-24 in Washington, DC) on the topic of trauma studies.

Panel Description:

Within literary trauma theory, no critic is more ubiquitous than Cathy Caruth whose seminal works—Unclaimed Experience (1996) and Trauma: Explorations in Memory (1995)—remain hegemonic more than two decades since their publication. Drawing on the work of psychiatrists Judith Herman and Bessel van der Kolk, Caruth imagines trauma as an “impossible history” and claims that to listen to trauma is to listen to narrative “departure.” Trauma figures into Caruth’s work as silence—a force strong enough to cause language to fail.

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