displaying 91 - 105 of 1966

CFP-Digital Humanities in Foreign Languages & Literatures Courses (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:16pm
NeMLA, Washington DC. March 21-24, 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The objective of this roundtable is to discuss best practices to include, organize, and create digital initiatives (ranging from small assignments to large collaborative projects) in the context of foreign languages and literatures courses across the curriculum. What happens when we bring digital initiatives like wikis, blogs, video and image tagging, social networking, mapping, or annotating texts in foreign languages and literatures courses? What happens when we intersect the principles and methods of Digital Humanities with the teaching of foreign languages and literatures?

Shepard Stages/Stages of Shepard

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:56pm
University of Louisville Literature and Culture Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 1, 2018

Seeking 15-20 minute papers on Sam Shepard’s work, global reputation, and/or career.  The panel will be part of the University of Louisville’s Literature and Culture Conference scheduled in February 2019.  Details are available here. https://www.thelouisvilleconference.com/  Please submit 250-word abstracts to ann.hall@louisville.edu by 1 September 2018.  

A New-old Spain: How Franco’s Dictatorship (Re)configured Spain’s Society

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:56pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and Francisco Franco’s subsequent dictatorship (1939-1975) were traumatic events that transformed the Spanish nation politically, socially, and economically. Whereas the II Republic sought to build a modern democratic, secular nation, the Falangist regime led to an authoritative, Catholic, ultra-conservative society that shaped, for instance, the education system and gender roles for the decades to come. This panel will accept papers that examine the ways in which Spanish identity was affected by Francoist ideology.

NEMLA 2019 Panel: The Animal-Human Divide in Victorian Fiction

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:36pm
Shun Kiang / University of Central Oklahoma
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The quest for science and progress at the expense of ethical concerns of (animal) pain is laid bare in Chapter XIV, “Doctor Moreau Explains,” of H. G. Wells’s science fiction The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896). In this chapter, Edward Prendick, protagonist and narrator, discovers that the creatures he has previously encountered on the deserted island are not “animalized victims . . . animal-men," but what Moreau refers to as “humanized animals—triumphs of vivisection” instead. At this juncture, Prendick hears from Moreau “‘[his] colourless delight of . . . intellectual desires,’” which has led the doctor to experiment on different animals to gauge their malleability and submission to human will.

Shifting the Absent Present: Pedagogical Approaches for More Inclusive Spaces

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This session seeks to use the concept of the absent present (that which is embodied by students but unacknowledged) within the classroom as a method of disclosure. Such a method is dedicated to both the literal and figurative spaces that foster agency for students and instructors as they embody and articulate multiple critical identities. Particular focus will be placed on the ways student backgrounds and identities are erased or ignored through various means including syllabi, modeled language, instructor feedback, and assignment and assessment structures. Attention to that which is present within our students but goes unacknowledged or undervalued allows for the exploration of ways to better foster more inclusive spaces.

From Ms. Pac-Man to GLaDOS: Gender and Diversity in Video Games

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:58pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Seminar at the 2019 NeMLA Convention

Washington, DC, March 21 - 24, 2019

Organizer: Kristopher Poulin-Thibault (University of Toronto)

New Representations of Motherhood in the Literature of the New Millennium

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:26pm
Laura Lazzari, Catholic University of America - NeMLA Annual Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Please consider submitting an abstract for the roundtable on New Representations of Motherhood in the Literature of the New MillenniumNeMLA Convention, Washington, DC, March 21-24, 2019.

 

Compared to a few decades ago, the birth rate in many Western countries has dramatically decreased and the roles and representations of maternal figures have changed significantly. Through IVF, gamete donation and surrogacy, motherhood is no longer defined univocally, and family structures have evolved accordingly. This panel seeks at investigating how biotechnology, social and family changes, law, and religion inform the representations of motherhood in the literature of the new millennium from an interdisciplinary perspective. 

Monuments

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
Nordic Association of American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

 

The Biennial Conference of the Nordic Association of American Studies

25 – 27 April 2019 in Bergen, Norway

Submission deadline: 15 Sept. 2018

 

Monuments construct the past in the present, and link it to a predetermined version of the future. Monuments tell singular and unified stories, acting as master narratives that impede other voices. Monuments have become some of America’s most important storytellers, giving form to power, but also to particular acts of resistance.

(Leeds IMC 2019) Materialities of Antipodal Medievalism: displaced materiality and cultural consumption of the northern Middle Ages for the peripheral medievalist.

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:57pm
Roderick McDonald/Australian Early Medieval Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 10, 2018

The Australian Early Medieval Association (AEMA) invites paper proposals for a panel at IMC Leeds 2019

Abstract: Antipodes are periphery to the European core, and recent developments in decolonization and the Global Middle Ages have contributed to understanding the inherent nature of a core/periphery dialectic that subsists in medieval studies.

Access for antipodal scholars (however defined) to the materialities (the products, the evidence) of medieval cultures of the northern hemisphere is heavily mediated, through hegemonic and competing mechanisms of scholarship (such as the academy) as well as through non-formal means, including popular and social media.

CFP: Critical Articles, Creative Works and Reviews

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:55pm
Technoculture: An Online Journal of Technology in Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 31, 2018

Technoculture (https://tcjournal.org) is seeking critical articles, creative works and reviews covering a broad range of books, movies, theater, games and other objects that focus on the use of technology in society for Volume 8 (2018). This call is ongoing and open topic; as a journal, we are interested in a conception of technology and the humanist impulse that pushes beyond contemporary American culture and its fascination with computers; we seek work that deals with any type of technology or technologies in any number of historical periods from any relevant theoretical perspective, such as:

CFP: Multilingual Poetry Today: Sound, Sense and Self in Motion

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
NeMLA Convention, Washington DC, March 21-24, 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“A nomadic poetics will cross languages,” states Pierre Joris, “not just translate, but write in all or any of them.” His foreshadowing of contemporary trends brings us to consider the stakes of multilingual fluency in works by Anne Tardos, Uljana Wolf, Jérôme Game, and Erin Mouré, among others. If the Modernists commonly tied multilingualism to erudite allusions, what forms do polyglot poets today use to restore cultural specificity? How do multilingual practices reframe figures of the foreign(er) and translatability? What reading communities do such works engender? Can multilingual poetry published in Anglophone countries resist becoming a trope of global culture?

Transnational Exchange and the Early Modern World (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:46pm
Victor Sierra Matute
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

How material exchange and mobility affect people and their ideas? How do these subjects and these objects transform the place of destination and its practices, knowledge, texts, and understanding of the world? This panel will address the consequences of the mobility of subjects and the exchange of objects in the early modern world. Early modernity is a time strongly characterized by the increasing crossing of boundaries. In this sense, this panel wants to analyze how material exchange enables different cultures to cross borders and permeate different social spaces, modifying those who import them and those who export them.

Critical Hermeneutics, Metacognition, and Writing

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:45pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 30, 2018

Call for Papers for NeMLA 2019 

 

Convention Site

Gaylord National Resort Center

Washington, DC

March 21-24, 2019

Convention Theme

Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples

 

Session: 17238.

Critical Hermeneutics, Metacognition, and Writing  

(Panel)

Rhetoric & Composition / Cultural Studies and Media Studies

Chair: Maryann DiEdwardo (University of Maryland University College)

 

Moving through Memory and Space

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:31pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel seeks to explore representations of transnational space and transcultural memory in literature of French expression. Whether through exile, immigration, travel, migritudeerrance, or the meanderings of the flâneur/flâneuse, francophones have traversed a wide global terrain. Just as authors integrate place into their creations, they in turn leave their stamp on the memories and associations that accrue to any geographical location. Cultural production then reflects and inflects shifting identitarian configurations.

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