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CFP for NeMLA 2019: Viscerality in the 20th Century

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:04pm
NeMLA March 21-24th, 2019 Washington, D.C
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

We are seeking submissions for our accepted panel, entitled "Viscerality in the 20th Century," at the Notheastern Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Conference to be held on March 21-24th, 2019 in Washington D.C.

Memory Machines and State Work

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:23pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This call is for an accepted session at the 50th Northeast Modern Language Association convention in Washington DC, March 21-24, 2019.  

Chair: Nathan Douglas / Indiana University, Dept. of Spanish & Portuguese

Call for Special Issue Proposals (Open Topic)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:08pm
English Language Notes
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 15, 2018

Call for Special Issue Proposals (Open Topic)

English Language Notes

Urban Space and Cityscapes: Italian perspectives in fiction, photography, and film.

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:56pm
Letizia Modena, Vanderbilt University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Dear Colleagues,

Please consider submitting a proposal to the following session for the NeMLA 2019 Convention in Washington, DC (March 21-24).

 Urban Space and Cityscapes: Italian perspectives in fiction, photography, and film.

NeMLA 2019 Panel: How Can Adjuncts, Graduate Students, and Tenured Professors Better Fight for the University We Want?

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:00pm
Michael Druffel / CUNY Graduate Center
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel, part of the NeMLA 2019 conference in Washington, DC from March 21-24, 2019, aims to bring together adjuncts, graduate students, and tenured professors to discuss how we can all work together to fight for a more democratic and just work environment. Topics might include ways to build solidarity to improve working conditions, more democratic ways to share power and responsibility between adjuncts, graduate students, and tenured professors, and ways to increase diversity in the university. Other topics that address solidarity between all workers in the university are welcome.

NeMLA 2019 panel: The Use of Audacity and Candor in Women's Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:01pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“Audacity” is having a moment in the women’s movement. Festivals, conferences and training sessions have used the term as shorthand for women speaking their truth and owning the power to direct the outcomes of their lives. (The Audacious Women Festival in Scotland and the Audacious Women’s Network in South Africa are two examples.)

Yet audacity is not new. Throughout history, outspoken women writers of fiction, poetry, and plays have positioned themselves in the vanguard of audacity, defying public censure and personal isolation to write candidly about their world. Transgression is a disruptor of patriarchal norms. Candor is transformational when it is deployed to pose questions, shatter stereotypes, and incite change.

Langland's Library (IPPS 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:06pm
Ann E. Killian, Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 7, 2018

Paper Panel: “Langland’s Library”

NEMLA 2019: Decolonial Approaches to Literature, Film and Visual Arts

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:39pm
Badreddine Ben Othman and Danielle Schwartz (Binghamton University SUNY)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

According to Walter Mignolo (2013, 2007), the triumphal narrative of modernity is inseparable from coloniality, or the logic of domination, exploitation, and oppression. While modernity builds itself on a triumphal narrative of civilization, progress, and development, modernity hides its darker side, “coloniality.” “Modernity/coloniality” shows that while modernity materializes in the rhetoric of salvation, modernity, capitalism, and coloniality are inseparable aspects yoked to authority and the control of economy. The first conceptualizations of modernity/coloniality/decoloniality, launched by Quijano (2007), focus on economic-political dimensions and the question of knowledge and racism.

Self-Translating as Creative Act

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:05pm
Mona Eikel-Pohen, Syracuse University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“Self-Translations are No Translations at All” was the title of a roundtable discussion at the 2018 NEMLA in Pittsburgh, where participants discussed both their own self-translations and those by renown self-translating authors such as Nabokov and Miłes and also spatial metaphors occurring in theories of self-translation.

This creative session would build upon that discussion and in this specific format allow participants to focus on presenting their own experiences with self-translation and expound phenomena and examples of their own writings and translations to be shared with other creative writers and/or (future) self-translators. Topics to be discussed could include:

Call for Papers: Alfred Hitchcock

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:49pm
Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Call for Papers

Alfred Hitchcock

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

 

40th Annual Conference, February 20-23, 2019

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.southwestpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: November 1, 2018

 

Call for chapters: Rhetorics of veg(etari)anism

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:30pm
Cristina Hanganu-Bresch, University of the Sciences
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Greetings! I am soliciting chapters for an anthology to be published with an academic press and which will cover a wide range of rhetorical perspectives on veganism as identity, practice, ideology, and discursive ecology. Broad topic areas may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Veg(etari)an techne: crafting veg(etari)an arguments about ethics, health, the environment;

  • Rhetorics of anti-veg(etari)an discourses: points of view from science, medicine, nutrition; popular culture – including social media, TV)

  • Representations of veg(etari)ans and veg(etari)anism in the media

Teaching 20th Century American Science Fiction Writers Including Harlan Ellison, Phillip K. Dick, Ray Bradbury and Isaac Asimov in the 21st Century

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:25pm
Annette M. Magid/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Science Fiction has always functioned as a literary multi-purpose vehicle in which writers are able to explore potentialities of the human condition. Even though sci-fi has been maligned by many as a poorly constructed near-juvenile literary form, scholars have discovered that sci-fi also provides a path from which one can bear witness into past practices and analyze the possibilities for the future.  The focus of this roundtable is to assess the influence of American science fiction writers to discuss the topics and techniques Harlan Ellison, Phillip K.

Influence of Karl Marx on American Literature

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:52pm
Annette M. Magid/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This being the 200th anniversary of the death of Karl Marx, a retrospective of his possible influence on American literature may be significant. For 200 years, theories espoused by Karl Marx have been threaded within the literature of America. Notable writers such as Edward Bellamy, Jack London, and Upton Sinclair each had a different perspective related to Marxian theory and practice. The transatlantic influence of Marx is evident in the utopian fiction of Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward and especially Bellamy’s Equality.

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