Diversity and Community in Narrative Medicine and the Medical Humanities

deadline for submissions: 
April 1, 2019
full name / name of organization: 
Survive and Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine
contact email: 

Diversity and Community in Narrative Medicine and the Medical Humanities

Deadline for Abstracts:

April 1, 2019

 

Full Name / Name of Organization:

Survive and Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine http://repository.stcloudstate.edu/survive_thrive/

 

Contact Email:

jbrown1@ccny.cuny.edu

Project co-edited by Julia Brown,  jbrown1@ccny.cuny.edu, Suzanne Black, suzanne.black@oneonta.edu, and Richard Diaz, rdiaz@qcc.cuny.edu

In this special issue of Survive and Thrive, we ask practitioners and scholars of medical humanities and narrative medicine to explore diversity and community in medicine. The related fields of medical humanities and narrative medicine are built on a foundation of patient advocacy. In recent years it has been noted that the fields of medical humanities and narrative medicine need to pay more attention to issues of diversity including, but not limited to, race, sexuality, gender, socioeconomic status, and disability.

We seek articles, creative works, reflective texts, and more that demonstrate and/or critique the work of medical humanities and narrative medicine to empower, enrich, or illuminate historically underserved communities in medicine. Contributors could address the potential shortcomings of medicine, narrative medicine, and/or medical humanities when serving diverse or underserved communities. Current criticism within this field discusses ways in which to bring diverse voices into the field. We are also interested in works that explore ways in which narrative medicine/medical humanities can help build diverse communities. We want to hear from practitioners, educators, and patients from historically underserved communities, and from practitioners and educators who work with these communities.

Send us your work exploring the relationship between narrative medicine and/or medical humanities with diversity (broadly conceived) in the health professions.

Scope of the Special Issue of Survive and Thrive

Survive and Thrive works within the allied traditions of Medical Humanities and of Narrative Medicine.  This special issue of Survive and Thrive looks at ways these fields work for and with diverse and underserved communities, and how these communities negotiate within, accept, and/or resist these fields.

We encourage submissions from related disciplines including—but not restricted to—narrative medicine, literature and medicine, age studies, religious studies, theology, history, philosophy, disability studies, deaf studies, gender studies, fat studies, queer theory, psychology, ethnicity and race studies, anthropology, sociology, feminist science studies, cultural and media studies, popular culture, and queer, disability, and feminist bioethics.

Possible submissions may be accounts of projects and activities like the following: exploring diversity in medical curriculum, creating or joining a diverse community program, telling and/or listening to (and learning from) diverse narratives, creating a space for diverse narratives to be heard, advocating for students and colleagues with disabilities/special needs, creating a work of art or literature that expresses themes of diversity and narrative medicine or medical humanities,  practicing social advocacy and political activism, exploring the relationship between practice and theory, examining the arts in care, and teaching cultural humility.

Suggested Bibliography:

  • Banner, Olivia. “Structural Racism and Practices of Reading in the Medical Humanities.” Literature and Medicine vol. 34, issue 1, 2018, pg 25-52.https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0001

  • Boler, M. “The Risks of Empathy: Interrogating Multiculturalism’s Gaze.” Feeling Power: Emotions and Education. New York, NY: Routledge 1999. p. 155-175.

  • Brown, Sherronda J. “Decolonizing Empathy: Why Our Pain Will Never be Enough to Disarm White Supremacy.” Black Youth Project 2017, http://blackyouthproject.com/decolonizing-empathy-why-pain-never-enough-disarm-white-supremacy/

  • Charon, R.  . “Honoring the stories of illness” YouTube. Uploaded by TEDx Talks, 4 Nov. 2011. https://youtu.be/24kHX2HtU3o

  • Rita Charon, Sayantani DasGupta, Nellie Hermann, Craig Irvine, Eric Marcus, Edgar Rivera-Colon, Danielle Spencer, and Maura Spiegel. The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017.

  • Charon, Rita and Sayantani Das Gupta. “Editor’s Preface: Narrative Medicine, or a Sense of Story.” Literature and Medicine vol 29, issue 2, 2011, pg vii-xiii. https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2011.0329.

  • Charon R. Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

  • Curtis, J. Memoirs of a Black Psychiatrist: A Life of Advocacy for Social Change. Michigan Publishing Services, 2017.

  • DasGupta, S. “Narrative humility: Sayatani DasGupta at TEDxSLC.” YouTube. Uploaded by TEDx Talks, 10 Jul. 2013. https://youtu.be/gZ3ucjmcZwY

  • Frank, Arthur W. At the Will of the Body: Reflections on Illness. Boston: Mariner Books, 2001.

  • Frank, Arthur W. The Wounded Storyteller. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995.

  • Garden R. “Who Speaks for Whom?: Health Humanities and the Ethics of Representation.” Medical Humanities. Vol. 41, issue 2, 2015, pg. 77-80. https://doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2014-010642.

  • Good, M., et. al. Shattering Culture: American Medicine Responds to Cultural Diversity. Russell Sage Foundation, 2011.

  • Guh, J., et al. “Antiracism in Residency: A Multimethod Intervention to Increase Racial Diversity in a Community-Based Residency Program.” Fam Med. 2019 Jan;51(1):37-40. doi: 10.22454/FamMed.2019.987621.
  • Homayounpour, G. Doing Psychoanalysis in Tehran. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2012.

  • Ikoku, A. “Defining the Humanities: Medical Humanities.” YouTube. Uploaded by Stanford, 17 May 2016. https://youtu.be/0a5WYClw3dw

  • Mahoney, MR. “Minority faculty voices on diversity in academic medicine: perspectives from one school.” Acad Med. 2008 Aug; 83(8):781-6. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31817ec002.

  • Mattingly, Cheryl. “The Concept of Therapeutic Emplotment.” Social Science and Medicine 38.6 (1994): 811-822. Elsevier Science. Web.

  • “Medical Humanities.” YouTube. Uploaded by Ohio Northern University, 8 Mar. 2016. https://youtu.be/CrL-r5A9dSE

  • Petty, JuLeigh, Jonathan M. Metzl, and Mia R. Keeys. “Developing and Evaluating an Innovative Structural Competency Curriculum for Pre-Health Students.” Journal of Medical Humanities vol. 38, issue 4,2017, pg. 459-71.https://doi.org/10.1007/s10912-017-9449-1

  • Ray, Keisha. “Intersectionality and the Dangers of White Empathy When Treating Black Patients.” 2017.http://www.bioethics.net/2017/03/intersectionality-and-the-dangers-of-white-empathy-when-treating-black-patients/

  • Redden, M. “How a Tiny City in New York Became a Beacon for Transgender Healthcare.” The Guardian 3 May 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/03/transgender-healthcare-d...

  • Spencer, D. “Narrative Medicine.” Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine. Eds. Miriam Solomon, Jeremy R. Simon, and Harold Kincaid. New York and London: Routledge, 2017. 372-82.

  • Tweedy, Damon. Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine. New York: Picador, 2016.

  • Veeder, R. “Writing and Medical Humanities.” YouTube. Uploaded by Rex Veeder, 1 Apr. 2015. https://youtu.be/IPLy-LsWQEE

  • Wear, Delese, and Julie M. Aultman. “The Limits of Narrative: Medical Student Resistance to Confronting Inequality and Oppression in Literature and Beyond.” Medical Education vol 39, issue 10, 2005, pg 1056-65.https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2005.02270.x

 

Submission Timeline

April 1, 2019:  Deadline for abstracts to jbrown1@ccny.cuny.edu

June 30, 2019:  Deadline for essays

Winter 2019:  Publication

Submission Requirements

"Submissions" may include text, video, audio, or image files that express the aims and scope of the journal. Submissions cannot have been previously published, nor be forthcoming in an archival journal or book (print or electronic). Please note that "publication" in a working-paper series does not constitute prior publication. In addition, by making a submission to Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine, the creator is stipulating that the material is not currently under review at another journal (electronic or print) and that he or she will not submit the material to another journal (electronic or print) until the completion of the editorial decision process at Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine. If you have concerns about the submission terms for Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrativeas Medicine, please contact the editors.

About Survive and Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine  

See http://repository.stcloudstate.edu/survive_thrive/aimsandscope.html

 

Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine aims to provide opportunities for sharing research, artistic work, pedagogical dialogue, and the practices of medical humanities and narrative as medicine. Although it is linked to the Survive and Thrive Conference and Arts Festival, the journal serves its own mission in education and the practice of humanities as they relate to illness, injury, and trauma. One of the primary aims of the journal is to bring medical humanities and narrative medicine to patients, survivors, and caregivers. Its emphasis, therefore, is on patients and survivors and their needs, and while aware of and supporting professional medical education, the journal is most concerned with an audience broader than an academic audience. We encourage physicians and others in the medical profession to practice Narrative as Medicine by submitting their work, especially when it encourages them to be artists – visual, performance, and literary. The scope of the journal is eclectic in that it considers all the disciplines of medicine and the humanities while focusing on their relationship and the needs of survivors and patients.

 

Diversity and Community in Narrative Medicine and the Medical Humanities

Deadline for Abstracts:

April 1, 2019

 

Full Name / Name of Organization:

Survive and Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine http://repository.stcloudstate.edu/survive_thrive/

 

Contact Email:

jbrown1@ccny.cuny.edu

Project co-edited by Julia Brown,  jbrown1@ccny.cuny.edu, Suzanne Black, suzanne.black@oneonta.edu, and Richard Diaz, rdiaz@qcc.cuny.edu

In this special issue of Survive and Thrive, we ask practitioners and scholars of medical humanities and narrative medicine to explore diversity and community in medicine. The related fields of medical humanities and narrative medicine are built on a foundation of patient advocacy. In recent years it has been noted that the fields of medical humanities and narrative medicine need to pay more attention to issues of diversity including, but not limited to, race, sexuality, gender, socioeconomic status, and disability.

We seek articles, creative works, reflective texts, and more that demonstrate and/or critique the work of medical humanities and narrative medicine to empower, enrich, or illuminate historically underserved communities in medicine. Contributors could address the potential shortcomings of medicine, narrative medicine, and/or medical humanities when serving diverse or underserved communities. Current criticism within this field discusses ways in which to bring diverse voices into the field. We are also interested in works that explore ways in which narrative medicine/medical humanities can help build diverse communities. We want to hear from practitioners, educators, and patients from historically underserved communities, and from practitioners and educators who work with these communities.

Send us your work exploring the relationship between narrative medicine and/or medical humanities with diversity (broadly conceived) in the health professions.

Scope of the Special Issue of Survive and Thrive

Survive and Thrive works within the allied traditions of Medical Humanities and of Narrative Medicine.  This special issue of Survive and Thrive looks at ways these fields work for and with diverse and underserved communities, and how these communities negotiate within, accept, and/or resist these fields.

We encourage submissions from related disciplines including—but not restricted to—narrative medicine, literature and medicine, age studies, religious studies, theology, history, philosophy, disability studies, deaf studies, gender studies, fat studies, queer theory, psychology, ethnicity and race studies, anthropology, sociology, feminist science studies, cultural and media studies, popular culture, and queer, disability, and feminist bioethics.

Possible submissions may be accounts of projects and activities like the following: exploring diversity in medical curriculum, creating or joining a diverse community program, telling and/or listening to (and learning from) diverse narratives, creating a space for diverse narratives to be heard, advocating for students and colleagues with disabilities/special needs, creating a work of art or literature that expresses themes of diversity and narrative medicine or medical humanities,  practicing social advocacy and political activism, exploring the relationship between practice and theory, examining the arts in care, and teaching cultural humility.

Suggested Bibliography:

  • Banner, Olivia. “Structural Racism and Practices of Reading in the Medical Humanities.” Literature and Medicine vol. 34, issue 1, 2018, pg 25-52.https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0001

  • Boler, M. “The Risks of Empathy: Interrogating Multiculturalism’s Gaze.” Feeling Power: Emotions and Education. New York, NY: Routledge 1999. p. 155-175.

  • Brown, Sherronda J. “Decolonizing Empathy: Why Our Pain Will Never be Enough to Disarm White Supremacy.” Black Youth Project 2017, http://blackyouthproject.com/decolonizing-empathy-why-pain-never-enough-disarm-white-supremacy/

  • Charon, R.  . “Honoring the stories of illness” YouTube. Uploaded by TEDx Talks, 4 Nov. 2011. https://youtu.be/24kHX2HtU3o

  • Rita Charon, Sayantani DasGupta, Nellie Hermann, Craig Irvine, Eric Marcus, Edgar Rivera-Colon, Danielle Spencer, and Maura Spiegel. The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017.

  • Charon, Rita and Sayantani Das Gupta. “Editor’s Preface: Narrative Medicine, or a Sense of Story.” Literature and Medicine vol 29, issue 2, 2011, pg vii-xiii. https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2011.0329.

  • Charon R. Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

  • Curtis, J. Memoirs of a Black Psychiatrist: A Life of Advocacy for Social Change. Michigan Publishing Services, 2017.

  • DasGupta, S. “Narrative humility: Sayatani DasGupta at TEDxSLC.” YouTube. Uploaded by TEDx Talks, 10 Jul. 2013. https://youtu.be/gZ3ucjmcZwY

  • Frank, Arthur W. At the Will of the Body: Reflections on Illness. Boston: Mariner Books, 2001.

  • Frank, Arthur W. The Wounded Storyteller. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995.

  • Garden R. “Who Speaks for Whom?: Health Humanities and the Ethics of Representation.” Medical Humanities. Vol. 41, issue 2, 2015, pg. 77-80. https://doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2014-010642.

  • Good, M., et. al. Shattering Culture: American Medicine Responds to Cultural Diversity. Russell Sage Foundation, 2011.

  • Guh, J., et al. “Antiracism in Residency: A Multimethod Intervention to Increase Racial Diversity in a Community-Based Residency Program.” Fam Med. 2019 Jan;51(1):37-40. doi: 10.22454/FamMed.2019.987621.
  • Homayounpour, G. Doing Psychoanalysis in Tehran. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2012.

  • Ikoku, A. “Defining the Humanities: Medical Humanities.” YouTube. Uploaded by Stanford, 17 May 2016. https://youtu.be/0a5WYClw3dw

  • Mahoney, MR. “Minority faculty voices on diversity in academic medicine: perspectives from one school.” Acad Med. 2008 Aug; 83(8):781-6. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31817ec002.

  • Mattingly, Cheryl. “The Concept of Therapeutic Emplotment.” Social Science and Medicine 38.6 (1994): 811-822. Elsevier Science. Web.

  • “Medical Humanities.” YouTube. Uploaded by Ohio Northern University, 8 Mar. 2016. https://youtu.be/CrL-r5A9dSE

  • Petty, JuLeigh, Jonathan M. Metzl, and Mia R. Keeys. “Developing and Evaluating an Innovative Structural Competency Curriculum for Pre-Health Students.” Journal of Medical Humanities vol. 38, issue 4,2017, pg. 459-71.https://doi.org/10.1007/s10912-017-9449-1

  • Ray, Keisha. “Intersectionality and the Dangers of White Empathy When Treating Black Patients.” 2017.http://www.bioethics.net/2017/03/intersectionality-and-the-dangers-of-white-empathy-when-treating-black-patients/

  • Redden, M. “How a Tiny City in New York Became a Beacon for Transgender Healthcare.” The Guardian 3 May 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/03/transgender-healthcare-d...

  • Spencer, D. “Narrative Medicine.” Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine. Eds. Miriam Solomon, Jeremy R. Simon, and Harold Kincaid. New York and London: Routledge, 2017. 372-82.

  • Tweedy, Damon. Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine. New York: Picador, 2016.

  • Veeder, R. “Writing and Medical Humanities.” YouTube. Uploaded by Rex Veeder, 1 Apr. 2015. https://youtu.be/IPLy-LsWQEE

  • Wear, Delese, and Julie M. Aultman. “The Limits of Narrative: Medical Student Resistance to Confronting Inequality and Oppression in Literature and Beyond.” Medical Education vol 39, issue 10, 2005, pg 1056-65.https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2005.02270.x

 

Submission Timeline

April 1, 2019:  Deadline for abstracts to jbrown1@ccny.cuny.edu

June 30, 2019:  Deadline for essays

Winter 2019:  Publication

Submission Requirements

"Submissions" may include text, video, audio, or image files that express the aims and scope of the journal. Submissions cannot have been previously published, nor be forthcoming in an archival journal or book (print or electronic). Please note that "publication" in a working-paper series does not constitute prior publication. In addition, by making a submission to Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine, the creator is stipulating that the material is not currently under review at another journal (electronic or print) and that he or she will not submit the material to another journal (electronic or print) until the completion of the editorial decision process at Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine. If you have concerns about the submission terms for Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrativeas Medicine, please contact the editors.

About Survive and Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine  

See http://repository.stcloudstate.edu/survive_thrive/aimsandscope.html

Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine aims to provide opportunities for sharing research, artistic work, pedagogical dialogue, and the practices of medical humanities and narrative as medicine. Although it is linked to the Survive and Thrive Conference and Arts Festival, the journal serves its own mission in education and the practice of humanities as they relate to illness, injury, and trauma. One of the primary aims of the journal is to bring medical humanities and narrative medicine to patients, survivors, and caregivers. Its emphasis, therefore, is on patients and survivors and their needs, and while aware of and supporting professional medical education, the journal is most concerned with an audience broader than an academic audience. We encourage physicians and others in the medical profession to practice Narrative as Medicine by submitting their work, especially when it encourages them to be artists – visual, performance, and literary. The scope of the journal is eclectic in that it considers all the disciplines of medicine and the humanities while focusing on their relationship and the needs of survivors and patients.