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Transmedia Storytelling in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

updated: 
Thursday, February 28, 2019 - 8:24am
Carrie Sickmann Han / Children's and Young Adult Literature Forum at the 2020 MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 3, 2019

The Children's and Young Adult Literature Forum invites abstract subissions for their 2020 MLA non-guaranteed session on Transmedia Storytelling in Children’s and Young Adult Literature:

CFP: "Literature and Post-Political Theory" MLA Panel (Seattle, 9-12 January 2020) (Deadline: 15 March 2019)

updated: 
Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 1:51pm
Juan Meneses, UNC Charlotte
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 15, 2019

 

“Literature and Post-Political Theory”

MLA 2020 Panel

 

 

This MLA panel seeks papers that reflect on the analytical bridges that might exist between post-political theory and literary studies. The main question the panel aims to answer is the following: Decades after everything was declared to be political, what are the affordances, triumphs, and pitfalls of a post-political theory of literature?

 

Late Romanticism, Past and Present

updated: 
Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 10:06am
University of Leuven, Belgium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 31, 2019

Late Romanticism, Past and Present

University of Leuven, 12–14 December 2019

https://www.arts.kuleuven.be/lateromanticism

Keynote Speakers

  • Angela Esterhammer (University of Toronto)
  • Tim Fulford (De Montfort University)
  • Sara Guyer (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Plenary Seminars

The Work of Community Colleges

updated: 
Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 9:20am
Two-Year College Association-West (TYCA-West)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 20, 2019

“The Work of Community Colleges”

TYCA-West 2019

11-12 OctoberTruckee Meadows Community College in Reno, NV

 

Plenary Speaker: Dan Melzer, Associate Professor, University of California, Davis

 

In his memoir, Bootstraps, Victor Villanueva shrewdly points out that “The community college is torn between vocational training and preparing the unprepared for traditional university work. And it seems unable to resolve the conflict.” This view of community colleges hasn’t changed much since Villanueva’s book was published in the early 1990s.