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NeMLA 2020 Panel: 'The New Lost Generation': African American Expatriate Writers in Paris, 1945-60

updated: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 5:08pm
Courtney Mullis, Duquesne University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 2020: Boston, MA

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

In his 1961 essay “The New Lost Generation,” James Baldwin argues that Europe gave the “new” African American expats of the late 1940s and the 1950s “the sanction, if one can accept it, to become oneself. No artist can survive without this acceptance. But rare indeed is the American artist who achieved this without first becoming a wanderer, and then, upon his return to his own country, the loneliest and most blackly distrusted of men.” Indeed, Baldwin asserts that African American expats in Paris gained a kind of liberation through their experience with a culture wholly unlike their own.

[NeMLA 2020] Detecting the Margins: New Perspectives on the Critical History of Detective Fiction (Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - 2:10pm
Mollie Eisenberg, Princeton University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since its emergence from the periodical press into the first mass-market novelistic craze, detective fiction has occupied a liminal position in the margins of aesthetic legitimacy—and critical study. Detection is a popular genre, a “literature of escape,” that nevertheless seems to make a claim to, and find purchase in, more rarefied aesthetic and intellectual precincts. Michael Holquist styles detection as a guilty pleasure of the reading classes: “The same people who spent their days with James Joyce were reading Agatha Christie at night.” This panel asks what that liminal position might show us about both the genre and the conditions—theoretical, professional, material—of its study. 

Call for Usable, Practical Teaching Resources

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:47am
During Office Hours
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 31, 2019

Who We Are:

At During Office Hours, we’re a group of like-minded teachers in higher education who want to create an easy to use, open access, nonprofit source for teaching resources.

Our Goals:

We want to be able to collect, share, and archive all the ideas, information, best practices, and advice that you’ve accumulated during your teaching careers. Whether you’re a seasoned veteran or a new teacher, a tenured professor or an adjunct or a TA, we hope that everyone can contribute to and benefit from this site.

Call for Chapters - Audio Disruption

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:47am
David Allan/Saint Joseph's University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 1, 2019

Objective of the book: This edited research book focuses on audio disruption from a wide spectrum. While some industries have been more disruptive than others, none have probably been more transformational than music streaming (Spotify, Pandora, etc.). While the disruption of the music industry itself due to streaming has been well documented, the disruption of the industries that rely on popular music namely radio, advertising and retail have not. For radio (iHeartMedia, Beasley, Entercom, etc.), this includes the additional audio competition and ever expanding availability and transportability.