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Historical Unfamiliarity: Racial Illegibility and Confusion across Time

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:26am
MELUS: The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 27, 2019

CFP for panel proposal to the annual meeting for MELUS (The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States) from 2-5 April 2020 in New Orleans, LA.

The MELUS conference theme (Awakenings and Reckonings: Multiethnic Literature and Effecting Change–Past, Present, and Future) calls for comparative and interdisciplinary analysis of representations and imaginings of the past, present, and future as they relate to race, ethnicity, citizenship, and diaspora.

Own and Other Voices: The 1st Biennial kidlit@hollins Symposium

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:25am
Hollins University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 14, 2020

American and English diasporic children’s literature plays a fundamental role in unconsciously reproducing the category of Self as white and male, and the rest of humankind as “Other.” Recent attempts to shift consciousness away from this include the hashtag #ownvoices coined on Twitter in 2015 by Corinne Duyvis, to use, she explains, “for whatever marginalized/diverse identity you want…and for whatever genre, category or form of art you want. As long as the protagonist and the author share a marginalized identity.” Of course, one marginalized identity no adult can share is that of a child. Still, we speak for children from their narrative viewpoints.

The Velveteen Rabbit, Forever Real

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:25am
Lisa Rowe Fraustino
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 30, 2019

This will be an edited collection to be proposed for publication in the ChLA Centennial Studies series, which celebrates classic children’s texts, books that have stood the test of time and played a significant role in the development of the field.  The editor invites chapter proposals of 350-500 words from a range of theoretical perspectives about The Velveteen Rabbit: Or How Toys Become Real by Margery Williams.

Special Issue: Injured Veterans and Spousal Caregiving

updated: 
Monday, December 2, 2019 - 8:06am
Journal of Veterans Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 6, 2020

Journal of Veterans Studies (JVS) Spring 2020 Issue

Guest Editor: Neil Southern,
Sheffield Hallam University, United Kingdom

Deadline: January 6, 2020

No-No Boy Redux: Asian American Literary Classics and the Public Domain

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:24am
Association of Asian American Studies 2020 Conference – Washington, D.C.
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Thanks to the CARP collective, John Okada’s 1956 No-No Boy was rescued from obscurity in 1976, and since 1979, has been published through the University of Washington Press with royalties going to the Okada family. In May 2019, Penguin Books marketed a new edition of the novel, tagging it as a classic of Asian American literature, but claiming that its copyright places the work in the public domain so that all proceeds go to Penguin. The Asian American community rallied against the new edition, and it has since been removed from various outlets.

 

Approaches to Hybridity in the Epic Genre

updated: 
Thursday, September 12, 2019 - 1:47pm
Société Rencesvals, American-Canadian Branch
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Approaches to Hybridity in the Epic Genre

55th International Congress on Medieval Studies

            Epic genre could be seen as what Mary Louis Pratt calls a "contact zone", a space in which diverse cultures "meet, clash and grapple with each other, often in contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power". It is a space where encounters give rise to new categories of gender, class, rule, and language. The concept of hybridity allows for the exploration of these spaces and voices that do not fit neatly into prescribed definitions.

FILM REVIEWS

updated: 
Wednesday, August 28, 2019 - 2:12pm
Dr. Antonio Sanna, journal "The Quint"
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

FILM REVIEWS FOR THE QUINT

 

DEHUMANIZATION IN LITERATURE: THE FIGURE OF THE PERPETRATOR

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:12am
The Anachronist
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 30, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

with renewed deadline

 

The New Series of The Anachronist

invites academic papers for its 2019 issue (to be published in early 2020), featuring

 

a thematic section on

“Dehumanization in Literature: the figure of the perpetrator,”

 

as well as a general section

Brutality and Resistance: Portraying Gendered and Sexualized Violence in Literature and Film

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:12am
American Comparative Literature Association seminar
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019

The history of literature and film is strewn with the brutalized bodies of women, queer people, and trans and non-binary people. Sometimes condemned, sometimes celebrated, such violence can occupy a central place in the meaning-making of the artistic work, but it might also serve only to reveal the character traits of perpetrating villains and rescuing heroes. This seminar aims to explore the effects of gendered and sexualized violence in literature and film and to theorize our approaches to its study. Are there ways to incorporate violence into literature and film that are more ethical or effective than others, and by what measures? Are there ways to analyze violence in literature and film that are more productive than others, and by what measures?

NeMLA 2020 Panel: Problematic Faves - Ethical Reading in the Age of Cancel Culture (Boston, March 5-8)

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:12am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

 

Panel: Problematic Faves - Ethical Reading in the Age of Cancel Culture

Northeast Modern Language Association Conference, Boston

March 5-8, 2020

“We need to now consider that we have elevated what we’ve inscribed as genius at the expense of the humanity and potential of people they silenced, erased, and preyed upon.”

Aditi Natasha Kini

Society for Novel Studies: The Novel's New Worlds

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:11am
Penny Fielding/ Society for Novel Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Society for Novel Studies

Biennial Conference 

Call for Papers: The Novel’s New Worlds

St. John’s College, University of Oxford

April 2-4, 2020

 

Highlights of the conference include:

Keynote lecture by Leah Price 

Special panel on Novel Objects (RÊVE: European Romanticisms in Association)

Keyword and Novel Seminars lead by  Nancy Armstrong – Adelene Buckland – Paul Crosthwaite – Mark Currie – Merve Emre –Alex Houen –  Yoon Sun Lee – Deidre Lynch – B. Venkat Mani –Ellen Rooney – Helen Small – Vanessa Smith –Aarthi Vadde

Peripatetic seminar on speculative fiction led by John Plotz

 

Brandeis Novel Symposium 2020: Willa Cather, Settler colonialism, indigeneity

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:11am
John Plotz/ Brandeis Novel Symposium
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

CFP: Brandeis Novel Symposium

Friday April 24, 2020

Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

 

Deadline for submissions: November 1, 2019 

The fourth annual Brandeis Novel Symposium examines the genre’s relation to issues of settler colonialism, land, and indigeneity. The focal text is Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House (1925). As in previous years, we invite papers that explore these larger questions from diverse theoretical, historical and formal angles, taking Cather’s novel either as focus or simply as a point of departure.

First Virtual Conference Language, Communication and Education (LCE2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 28, 2019 - 2:41pm
FUR
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 15, 2019

The First Virtual Conference Language, Communication and Education (LCE2020) will be held on January 15-17, 2020 (15-22h Central European Time). The theme of LCE2020 is “Linguistic Advances in the Digital Era”. Seven thematic strands have been distinguished (see conference strands and topics).

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