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displaying 1 - 15 of 26

From the Margins to the Center: Reevaluating “Tradition” in English Studies

updated: 
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 4:34pm
University of Texas San Antonio Graduate English Organization
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

From the Margins to the Center: Reevaluating “Tradition” in English Studies

Graduate Student Symposium ft. keynote by Ariana Brown

February 22, 2020

University of Texas at San Antonio

 

“Enslaved Black folk couldn’t lift shackled feet,

so instead they shuffled

& invented the cumbia—

& you can’t tell me there aren’t many ways to survive,

to remember the dead,

to make a freedom where there isn’t one.”

Excerpt from Ariana Brown, “Cumbia,” published in the Acentos Review, 2019

Eat/Play/Tweet: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Storytelling and Identity in Popular Culture

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:42am
Popular Culture Research Centre, Auckland University of Technology
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 17, 2020

The Popular Culture Research Centre (Auckland University of Technology) welcomes papers for its upcoming interdisciplinary conference on the theme of ‘storytelling and identity’ in popular culture. The conference will be held in Auckland on 7-9 July 2020.

Ubu: Grotesquery in Political Theory (ACLA Chicago)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:41am
Brendan McGillicuddy (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 22, 2019

Michel Foucault opened his 1974 seminars at the Collège de France - published as "Abnormal" - with a series of comments that link his theory of “governmentality” to the aesthetic category of the grotesque.

Call For Papers:The Comparative Media Arts Journal Issue 7| Responding to Site Specificity

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:40am
The Comparative Media Arts Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 18, 2019

Issue 7 of the Comparative Media Arts Journal examines responses towards art engagement with land and space. Artworks, performances, music, sound art, and other mediums of art are often associated with the spaces designed to contain them, the theatre (Moving Image and Theatre), the concert hall, the museum or gallery. Yet, these institutional spaces curate art with specific intentions; imposing restrictions on artists and their process. These spaces also call for audiences to engage in specific ways, by sitting down to watch and listen or walk around without touching the art. Institutional spaces designed for Art restrict the people who can create/ participate to those who subject themselves to the space’s confines.   

Extractivismo y necropolítica: Nuevas lecturas de La vorágine

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:40am
Adela Pineda, Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 28, 2019

La vorágine (1924), novela cumbre del escritor colombiano José Eustasio Rivera (1888-1928) fue considerada una novela regionalista al ser subsumida a la imprecisa categoría de “novela de la tierra”. Este panel propone otras lecturas: aquellas que contemplen problemáticas ambientales (la violenta extracción de recursos naturales), éticas (las implicaciones necropolíticas del legado colonial), y estéticas (el lugar espectral de la literatura en un contexto posthumano). De esta manera, el panel busca releer La vorágine no sólo en el contexto de la literatura mundial sino también de los estudios culturales.

 

This panel will take place at NEMLA, Boston MA, in March 2020

Extractivismo y necropolítica: Nuevas lecturas de La vorágine

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:39am
Adela Pineda, Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 28, 2019

La vorágine (1924), novela cumbre del escritor colombiano José Eustasio Rivera (1888-1928) fue considerada una novela regionalista al ser subsumida a la imprecisa categoría de “novela de la tierra”. Este panel propone otras lecturas: aquellas que contemplen problemáticas ambientales (la violenta extracción de recursos naturales), éticas (las implicaciones necropolíticas del legado colonial), y estéticas (el lugar espectral de la literatura en un contexto posthumano). De esta manera, el panel busca releer La vorágine no sólo en el contexto de la literatura mundial sino también de los estudios culturales.

Decolonizing Growth and Development in Postcolonial Writing (NeMLA 2020 Panel)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Echoing the enlightenment ideals and yet widely considered groundbreaking, the United Nations Declaration on the Right to Development in 1986 proclaimed that “the right to development is an inalienable human right by virtue of which every human person and all peoples are entitled to participate in, contribute to, and enjoy economic, social, cultural and political development, in which all human rights and fundamental freedoms can be fully realized.” As Joseph Slaughter denounces as tautological, this declaration presumed that human rights and freedoms could not be made possible without proper development.

CFP 4th Posthuman Global Symposium “POSTHUMAN AGENCY” (NYU April 30-May 2, 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 11, 2019 - 10:03am
POSTHUMAN GLOBAL SYMPOSIUMS - Conference Series at NYU since 2015
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 31, 2019

The fourth edition of the Series, entitled "Posthuman Agency" will be held at NYU, in New York City, from April 30 to May2nd 2020.

The Call for Papers is now open. Deadline: December 31st 2019

CFP

COMMUNICATING ACROSS DIFFERENCES: An Anthology of Intercultural Communicative

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:27am
Cynthia Wang / Cal State LA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 20, 2019

Deadline extended to September 20th.

 

In recent years, our society has become increasingly divisive socially, culturally, politically, and geographically. Just in the US alone, we have seen a rise in conflicts based on differing as well as emerging identities, political views, cultural origins, nationalities, and socio-economic backgrounds.

 

(Reminder - due today) For & Against Practice: Approaches to Teaching Professional Writing

updated: 
Monday, September 30, 2019 - 5:27pm
Callie Ingram & Jiwon Ohm / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This roundtable will provide a forum for participants to discuss and analyze their experiences and offer suggestions for teaching the multi-major professional writing course, more commonly referred to as simply “business writing” or “professional writing.” We especially welcome presentations that speak to and offer strategies targeting one of our three major concerns with the course: its decontextualized state, its reliance on non-neutral codes of professionalism, and the lack of pedagogical support often given to its instructors.

Renewable and Disposable Assignments in Literature Courses

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:26am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Many of us structure syllabi according to a familiar read-discuss-write a paper rhythm, a sequence that allows students to further explore ideas independently and in depth. But as natural and inevitable as this process seems, what really comes of the hours we all invest in the writing and grading of literary analysis papers?

Exploring the Renaissance 2020: An International Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019 - 1:45pm
South-Central Renaissance Conference / SCRC
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 16, 2019

The South-Central Renaissance Conference (SCRC) and its affiliate societies

Queen Elizabeth I Society

Andrew Marvell Society

Society for Renaissance Art History

 

invite conference papers for

Exploring the Renaissance 2020

March 26-28, 2020

Southern Methodist University

Dallas, TX

 

Social Mobility in the French Urban Peripheries

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:26am
NeMLA Annual Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Media depictions of the French cité often present these peripheral areas as spaces in which multiethnic, multiracial youth are hopelessly confined; crime, drugs, violence, and poverty are depicted as inescapable conditions of their daily lives. Youth are portrayed as unable to penetrate beyond the boundaries of their neighborhoods and assimilate into the rest of middle-class, majority white France. Yet, concurrently, these residents of the cité are also characterized by their mobility and itinerancy, in opposition to the “Français de souche” who are firmly anchored in the terroir. Transnational markers of class and racial difference suggest that the ability to move around and resettle is an inescapable trait.

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