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Global Conference on Women and Gender Playreading

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:46am
Christopher Newport University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Christopher Newport University’s

College of Arts and Humanities seeks 45-minute scripts or excerptsfor the forthcoming conference on the

Global Conference on Women and Gender 

to be held at CNU, March 19-21, 2020

 

Scripts should engage with the theme of the conference (see below).

The script will be presented as a staged reading followed by a response which includes the playwright as well as additional scholar/artists who can speak to the themes of the work, specific date TBD.

 

Black Comedy in Contemporary Theater

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
Miriam Chirico for Comparative Drama Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 31, 2019

Call for Papers: Black Comedy in Contemporary Theater

Panel at the Comparative Drama Conference, Rollins College, Orlando, Florida: April 2-4, 2020

 

Deadline: October 31, 2019

 

Black comedy, as a genre, is under-theorized.  Black comedy received scholarly attention fifty years ago with the advent of such literary humorists as Kurt Vonnegut or Joseph Heller.  Interest has resurged in the twenty-first century in response to idiosyncratic cinematography of Quentin Tarantino or the Cohen Brothers, and in order to address the mordant satire of alternative media post-9/11. 

Bringing Mythology Back: A Call for the Literary Study of Mythic Narratives

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
2020 NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Mythological narratives constitute a significant portion of the world’s most influential literature; nevertheless, they are glaringly absent from contemporary literary studies. Students interested in the study of mythology are directed to departments of anthropology, religion, or intellectual heritage, and these fields certainly conduct invaluable examinations of world-mythology; however, myths are unequivocally literary in nature, and their omission in departments of literature is both a detriment to the field and a disservice to world cultures. What went wrong with the study of myth-as-literature, and how can we revive this genre to reinvigorate the field of literary studies? 

What went wrong?

Examination Without Misrepresentation: Analyzing Culturally Diverse Narratives

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
2020 NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

How can academics attempt to faithfully translate, interpret, analyze, and/or discuss the creative narratives of cultures and communities to which they have no personal connection? This roundtable will insist that this question, although immensely complex, is not rhetorical—and that we, as students and scholars of literature, language, and culture, are positioned to conduct particularly constructive explorations into possible answers.

NeMLA Panel: 'The New Lost Generation': African American Expatriate Writers in Paris, 1945-60

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:45am
Courtney Mullis, Duquesne University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 2020: Boston, MA

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

In his 1961 essay “The New Lost Generation,” James Baldwin argues that Europe gave the “new” African American expats of the late 1940s and the 1950s “the sanction, if one can accept it, to become oneself. No artist can survive without this acceptance. But rare indeed is the American artist who achieved this without first becoming a wanderer, and then, upon his return to his own country, the loneliest and most blackly distrusted of men.” Indeed, Baldwin asserts that African American expats in Paris gained a kind of liberation through their experience with a culture wholly unlike their own.

[NeMLA 2020 Panel] "Imagining the Past: Neo-Medievalism in Fantasy Genre"

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:44am
Jiwon Ohm/ Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In “Dreaming of the Middle Ages,” Umberto Eco asks the question: “What would Ruskin, Morris, and the pre-Raphaelites have said if they had been told that the rediscovery of the Middle Ages would be the work of the twentieth-century mass media?”

Indeed, the twentieth-century mass media has disseminated what Eco calls, “escapism à la Tolkien” which has influenced many modern writers and cultural producers in other mass media such as films and video games. Although such “escapism à la Tolkien,” or “Tolkienesque” fantasy, seems harmless as pure entertainment, its consumption is massive, and many picture the Middle Ages not as it actually was, but how it is depicted through medievalist fantasy.

2020 Call for Articles in Communication, Media, and Journalism Studies

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:44am
KOME - An International Journal of Pure Communication Inquiry
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 31, 2020

Call for Articles in Communication, Media, and Journalism Studies KOME, an Europe-based international Open Access journal is currently accepting submissions for its 2020 issues. We are  a theory and pure research-oriented journal of communication studies and related fields. Basically, we consider results from the field of Communication, Media, Journalism and Theatre & Film studies that includes both strict theoretical contribution and methodological rigour (one could think that this basically means social sciences perspectives, but we also consider papers closer to the humanities side of communication and media studies). We accept submissions on a rolling basis.

CFP: Stardom and Fandom, Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference (2/19-22)

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:44am
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 31, 2019

Proposals for papers and panels are now being accepted for the 41st annual SWPACA conference.  One of the nation’s largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels. 

 The Area Chair for Stardom and Fandom invites paper or panel proposals on any aspect of stardom or fandom. The list of ideas below is limited, so if you have an idea that is not listed, please suggest the new topic. We are an interdisciplinary area and encourage submissions from multiple perspectives and disciplines. Topics might include:

Studies of individual celebrities and their fans, both current and historical

The Texas Center for Working-Class Studies Sixth Annual Conference

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:43am
Collin College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

The Texas Center for Working-Class Studies, housed at Collin College, a two-year institution serving Collin County, is pleased to announce a one-day Working-Class Studies conference for interested scholars and students. The conference will consist of panels in a range of disciplines and on a variety of issues related to social class and labor issues, both historical and contemporary. The keynote speaker will be noted scholar Barbara Jensen, author ofReading Classes: On Culture and Classism in America. Jensen, also a licensed community and counseling psychologist, has been examining and teaching about working-class cultures and classism for over thirty years.

Shaping Identity in Ezra Pound's Poetry

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:43am
Jeff Grieneisen / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel explores the relationship between Ezra Pound's poetry and the cultures and people—real, created, and re-created—that he uses to inhabit that poetry. From his early work, such as we find in A Lume Spento and Personae, and the culmination of his life's work in The Cantos, Pound shapes and shares many identities with the ultimate goal of pursuing truth and beauty. Panel papers might also explore Pound's use of numerous foreign languages in shaping and sharing these identities.

Signs, Representations and Other Biases: An International Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:43am
University of Central Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

The sign creates our world and represents our thoughts about this world.
The sign is an enabler, a limiter, and a producer of our biases.
The sign is the trouble.
If all signs are arbitrary, how can we distinguish between the signifier and the signified while using language? How can representation and its analysis be in the same medium? How can arbitrariness be implicated with biases? Do we need a universal metalanguage that can analyse the limits of language? Or have we reached a historical moment of aporia? 

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Aristotle à rebours, Unconventional Aristotelianism in Medieval Italy and Beyond

updated: 
Thursday, September 19, 2019 - 10:08pm
Joseph Romano / Italian and Italianists at Kalamazoo
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 28, 2019

Aristotle à rebours:

Unconventional Aristotelianism in Medieval Italy and Beyond

Sponsored by Italians & Italianists at Kalamazoo

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020, May 7-10


 

Aristotle’s transformation from heretical source to intellectual authority testifies to the fact that his scholastic assimilation was uneven and often controversial, and it is the aim of this panel to explore those figures whose Aristotelianism has been perceived, by either their contemporaries or their scholars, as historically peculiar or unorthodox.

Truth-Telling: Experimental Forms in Essay and Poetry, a Reading & Discussion

updated: 
Monday, September 23, 2019 - 11:42am
Heather J. Macpherson & Elizabeth Foulke/University of Rhode Island
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019

What does it mean to tell the truth? Are we obligated to inform, or reveal with specificity? What approaches do creative writers apply in disclosing the personal? Does experimentation hide or reveal the truth? Our creative essays and poetry engage with inherent obstacles of truth in life writing. Following a reading of our essays and poetry, we will invite conversation on the ways in which experimental literary forms test the boundaries of truth-telling and subjectivity, and complicate the defining and teaching of genres. 

 

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