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Latinx Counterpublics

updated: 
Saturday, November 2, 2019 - 2:58pm
Latinx Studies Association Biennial Conference / University of Notre Dame / July 15-18, 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

In the U.S. public sphere, Latinxs are often reduced to mere numbers—to checkmarks on census forms, data points in demographic surveys, and statistics about economic sectors. However, Latinxs cannot be contained in these quantitative frameworks; through our experiences at the thresholds of the Americas, we have developed distinctive approaches to individual and collective life. With the U.S. public sphere in a “time of crisis” (to invoke our conference’s theme), this panel seeks new scholarship on Latinx counterpublics—on the social networks that have taken shape as Latinxs have looked at, listened to, and engaged with media.

The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe:Hearing and Auditory Perception

updated: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019 - 3:28pm
FMRSI/Trinity College Dublin,
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

Trinity College Dublin, 24-25 April 2020

Proposals for papers are invited for a conference on The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception, which aims to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers with an interest in the history of the senses in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Keynote Speaker:

Professor David Hendy, University of Sussex

Echoes on the Air: How Modern Media Evoke and Dramatize
the Sounds of the Distant Past

 

Spaces in Transit: Literary and Cultural Responses to Mnemonic Landscapes

updated: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2019 - 3:28pm
Lourdes López-Ropero
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

CFP Seminar “Spaces in Transit: Literary and Cultural Responses to Mnemonic Landscapes”

The European Society for the Study of English (ESSE)

15th ESSE Conference

August 31-September 4, 2020, Lyon, France

Seminar “Spaces in Transit: Literary and Cultural Responses to Mnemonic Landscapes”