CFP: [American] NEMLA- Affect and Technology: Connecting America at the Turn of the 20th Century

full name / name of organization: 
Daniel Wuebben
contact email: 
danwuebben@gmail.com

NEMLA

Northeastern Modern Language Association
Boston, MA
Feb. 26-March 1

"Affect and Technology: Connecting America at the Turn of the 20th Century"

America at the turn of the 20th century is an important place and time to
examine the way technologies affected and mediated different scales of
social relations, whether political, personal, or both. Like the other
technologies responsible for the transmission of affect, such as the
telegraph, railroad, telephone, film, and steam engine, literature was also
instrumental in both representing and 'affecting' populations. While the
emergent technologies of this period (approximately 1876-1914)
"annihilated" space and time by connecting and mobilizing dispersed bodies
across vast geographies, they also mediated socio-relational perceptions,
political change, and affective experience.

 

Submissions might be focused on: the affects of social change; mass
politics; connecting/wiring bodies and regions, swarms and mobs; spaces
like the frontier; electrifying populations and/or electric affects; film
affects and national audiences; illumination and urban electrification; the
electric fields of consciousness; telepathy and telegraphs; (barbed) wiring
the landscape; emotional and political contagions; and affective social
networks. (The "America" invoked here includes spaces beyond but related to
North America; submissions interested in diaspora, the Atlantic, the
Pacific, or Caribbean welcome). Send 250 word abstracts to
justinrogerscooper_at_gmail.com or danwuebben_at_gmail.com by September 15, 2008.

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Received on Tue May 27 2008 - 11:58:53 EDT

cfp categories: 
american