CFP: Culture, Theory and Critique (journal)

full name / name of organization: 
Greg Hainge
contact email: 
greg.hainge@adelaide.edu.au

X-posted from Pillarbox_at_yahoogroups.com
----CULTURE, THEORY AND CRITIQUECall for papers (3) and contents of 43.1.Unless specified otherwise, please direct all correspondence regardingCTC to: ctc_at_nottingham.ac.uk ; apologies for cross-postings.For full details on _Culture, Theory and Critique_, submissioninformation, instructions to authors, a free online sample copy andcontents listings from volume 43 on, please visit the journal's websiteat:http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/routledge/14735784.htm_Culture, Theory and Critique_ is an interdisciplinary journal for thetransformation and development of critical theories in the humanitiesand social sciences. It aims to critique and reconstruct theories byinterfacing them with one another and by relocating them in new sitesand conjunctures. _Culture, Theory and Critique’s_ approach totheoretical refinement and innovation is one of interaction andhybridisation via recontextualisation and transculturation. Thereconceptualisation of critical theories is achieved by:* assessing how well theories emerging from particular spatial,cultural, geographical and historical contexts travel and translate intonew conjunctures.* confronting theories with their limitations or aporias throughimmanent critique.* applying theories to cultural, literary, social and politicalphenomena in order to test them against their respective fields ofconcern and to generate critical feedback.* interfacing theories from different intellectual, disciplinary andinstitutional settings._Culture, Theory and Critique_ publishes one special issue and one openissue per volume.CALL FOR PAPERS – OPEN ISSUESInquiries for open issues should be directed to: ctc_at_nottingham.ac.uk.Submissions for open issues should be sent to _Culture, Theory andCritique, Department of Hispanic and Latin American Studies, Universityof Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK. Submissions for the open issuesmay be sent at any time.Submissions are subject to peer review.CALL FOR PAPERS: SPECIAL ISSUE, APRIL 2004 ‘PRACTICES OF ORDINARY ANDEXTRAORDINARY MEDIATION’.Globalization has allegedly facilitated contacts and brought about newtypes of exchanges between individuals and communities: today’simmigrants, merchants, soldiers, politicians, journalists, but alsoneighbours and lovers increasingly have to communicate with subjects orcommunities that do not share their culture, their history, or eventheir language. They need facilitators, translators, go-betweens (otherhumans, or technological or discursive tools). This issue of _Culture,Theory and Critique_ will examine how practices of mediation are beingreinvented in the context of cultural, social or political encounters.Contributors are encouraged to explore a whole range of discursivepractices, from the most official forms of negotiation (in the contextof international conflicts for example) to the most ordinary andapparently banal examples of mediation (translating direction for atourist, filling out forms for parents).Inquiries and submissions should be directed to Professor MireilleRosello, WCAS French and Italian, 1859 Sheridan Rd #152, NorthwesternUniversity, Evanston, IL 60208-2204, USA; m-rosello_at_northwestern.edu.Deadline for submissions: 1 June 2003.CALL FOR PAPERS: SPECIAL ISSUE, MAY 2005 ‘NOISE’.Today, noise is breaking away from the status of undesirable phenomenonbestowed upon it by traditional communications theory. No longer merelyan undesirable element to be eradicated so as to retain the purity ofthe original signal, noise is infecting expression from all realms,spawning genres and movements, complexifying rather than destroyingsemantics. Indeed, noise has become an integral part of our late moderncondition, and not only because of the amount of noise produced by lateindustrial and digital societies. It is perhaps only natural that weattempt to insulate ourselves from this latter noise, but to treat allnoise in this way, to attempt to eradicate *all* forms of noise isfundamentally to disavow the ground on which our every expression istransmitted. This issue of _Culture, Theory and Critique_ will aim tolisten to (or look at) noise in all of its guises both literal andmetaphorical, to restore noise to its rightful place and to examine theways in which noise can refigure existing theories, theories which alsoat times collude in this politics of noise reduction.Amongst the key issues to be addressed in this volume will be:* Manifestations of noise in culture (noise music, post-digital music,static, hiss, snow and other complex frequencies).* The ‘silent’ noise behind various communicational acts (what is atstake when mistaking this noise for silence?)* The construction of meaning (why is it that meaning is challenged bynoise and what does meaning arise from?)* The politics of noise (does noise indeed signal a new politicaleconomy as Attali claimed? is noise revolt?)* Noise and hybridity (does hybridity challenge a noiseless economy?)* Should noise and noisiness be maintained (or perhaps maintained solelyas an outside) or is a politics of noise reduction justified?* Does noise constitute a possible alterity?Inquiries and submissions should be directed to: Dr Greg Hainge, Schoolof Humanities, University of Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.greg.hainge_at_adelaide.edu.auand to: Dr Paul Hegarty, Department of French, University College Cork,Cork, Ireland. phegarty_at_french.ucc.ieDeadline for submissions: 1 June 2004.JUST PUBLISHED. VOLUME 43.1 May 2002. SPECIAL ISSUE ON ‘EUROCENTRISM’.Contents:Chu-Chueh Cheng‘Imperial Cartography and Victorian Literature: Charting the Wishes andAnguish of an Island-Empire’, pp. 1-16Paul Allatson, Adam Le Nevez, Yixu Lu, et al.‘ “Average Stray Aliens”: An Average Australian Conversation onEurocentrism’, pp. 17-32April R. Biccum‘Interrupting the Discourse of Development: On a Collision Course withPostcolonial Theory’, pp. 33-50Gerhard Richter‘Sites of Indeterminacy and the Spectres of Eurocentrism’, pp. 51-65Colin Wright‘Centrifugal Logics: Eagleton and Spivak on the Place of “Place” inPostcolonial Theory’, pp. 67-82Notes on Contributors, p. 83 =============================================== From the Literary Calls for Papers Mailing List CFP_at_english.upenn.edu Full Information at http://www.english.upenn.edu/CFP/ or write Erika Lin: elin_at_english.upenn.edu ===============================================Received on Tue Dec 24 2002 - 11:52:44 EST

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