CFP: Comic Book Masculinities (12/31/03; collection)

full name / name of organization: 
Hamilton Carroll
contact email: 
hamilton.carroll@lcc.gatech.edu

Call for Papers for a Collection of Essays on Comic Book Masculinities.

 =46rom the publication of the first Superman comic strip in 1938 =
through=20
the Cold War politics of Marvel Comics and the 1980=92s =93deconstruction=20=

of the superhero,=94 superhero comics have been an indelible part of=20
American culture. We are currently witnessing a resurgence of the=20
comic book hero (see the large number of Hollywood feature films and=20
"real hero" comic books on the market, for example) and, with series=20
such as Marvel's recent reworking of the Captain America back story,=20
=93Truth,=94 the continued re-evaluation of the superhero icon=92s place =
in=20
U.S. culture. Despite their ongoing popularity, however, scholarly=20
work on comics is scant and of mixed quality. With the rise of=20
cultural studies and the increased attention given to popular culture=20
as a valid site of academic interest, comic books can tell us much=20
about contemporary U.S. culture. Beginning from the assumption that=20
the comic book is a valid and vital American art form, this collection=20=

seeks to examine the history of the superhero comic book as a=20
representational form. Specifically, this collection will address the=20=

various, conflicting, and ongoing ways in which the comic book=20
superhero represents and constructs multiple versions of masculine=20
identity in U.S. culture.

For consideration, please send the following information to Dr.=20
Hamilton Carroll (hamilton.carroll_at_lcc.gatech.edu) by 12/31/03:
1. Paper title and abstract/proposal (500 words).
2. Brief vita or one-paragraph biography.
3. Complete personal information: name, department, academic=20
affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address.

Worthwhile topics include (but are not limited to):
Representations of the superhero post-9/11
Cinematic imaginings of the comic book hero
Race and the superhero
Gender and the superhero
Superheroes and nationalism
Alternative superhero comics
Queer comics
Politics of/and the superhero
The superhero on television
Superheroes and the crisis of masculinity
Feminist interventions in the superhero canon
Non-U.S. superhero comics

--Apple-Mail-20-1147931
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<fontfamily><param>Times</param>Call for Papers for a Collection of
Essays on Comic Book Masculinities. =20

=46rom the publication of the first Superman comic strip in 1938 through
the Cold War politics of Marvel Comics and the 1980=92s =93deconstruction
of the superhero,=94 superhero comics have been an indelible part of
American culture. We are currently witnessing a resurgence of the
comic book hero (see the large number of Hollywood feature films and
"real hero" comic books on the market, for example) and, with series
such as Marvel's recent reworking of the Captain America back story,
=93Truth,=94 the continued re-evaluation of the superhero icon=92s place =
in
U.S. culture. Despite their ongoing popularity, however, scholarly
work on comics is scant and of mixed quality. With the rise of
cultural studies and the increased attention given to popular culture
as a valid site of academic interest, comic books can tell us much
about contemporary U.S. culture. Beginning from the assumption that
the comic book is a valid and vital American art form, this collection
seeks to examine the history of the superhero comic book as a
representational form. Specifically, this collection will address the
various, conflicting, and ongoing ways in which the comic book
superhero represents and constructs multiple versions of masculine
identity in U.S. culture. =20

</fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Times New Roman</param>For
consideration, please send the following information to Dr. Hamilton
Carroll (hamilton.carroll_at_lcc.gatech.edu) by 12/31/03:

1. Paper title and abstract/proposal (500 words). =20

2. Brief vita or one-paragraph biography. =20

3. Complete personal information: name, department, academic
affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. =20

Worthwhile topics include (but are not limited to):

Representations of the superhero post-9/11

Cinematic imaginings of the comic book hero

Race and the superhero

Gender and the superhero

Superheroes and nationalism

Alternative superhero comics

Queer comics

Politics of/and the superhero

The superhero on television

Superheroes and the crisis of masculinity

Feminist interventions in the superhero canon

Non-U.S. superhero comics

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Received on Sat Nov 15 2003 - 19:11:38 EST

cfp categories: 
journals_and_collections_of_essays