UPDATE: Nostalgia (6/7/04; journal issue)

full name / name of organization: 
Douglas Dowland
contact email: 
douglas-dowland@uiowa.edu

(UPDATE) CFP: NOSTALGIA (IJCS, 5/7/04)

UPDATE:

The deadline for submissions has been extended to JUNE 7, 2004. Inquiries
regarding submissions should be e-mailed to Sean Scanlan at
sean-scanlan_at_uiowa.edu.

The Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies is currently soliciting submissions
for an upcoming special issue on:

NOSTALGIA

Guest Editors: Tom Lutz and Sean Scanlan

What are the most recent manifestations of nostalgia, and what are the
theoretical implications of the desire to return to a lost place and time?
Critics such as Fredric Jameson claim that nostalgia represents a crisis of
history, but yearning for a lost past can also mean a yearning for a mode
of representing the loss, hence, nostalgia is also linked to a crisis of
aesthetics. Considered a medical condition associated with homesickness in
the late 1700s, nostalgia has transcended both medicine and psychology, and
has been dispersed into all facets of culture. Nostalgia still carries its
etymological heritage of yearning for a lost home, but through the 1980s
and 90s, the term became attached to political allegiances, to problems of
theorizing history, and to models of consumerism. It is now time to revisit
nostalgia, to move it forward, and to see how it has changed.

For this special issue we are interested in investigating the role of
nostalgia as it is engaged by both the academy and popular culture. Is
there a new nostalgia? Is nostalgia a form of psychological whiplash, a
cultural style, the abdication of memory, an aesthetic treatment, an
ornament, a technique, a part of the narrative of history, or a part of the
narrative of critical theory? Possible topics include, but are not limited
to: representations of nostalgia in literature, film, television,
architecture, music, art, entertainment, criticism and theory, memoir,
fashion; nostalgia as it relates to modernism, postmodernism, memory,
aesthetics, history, medicine, and psychology; and nostalgia in the
historical novel, black and white photography and film, technology, and
politics.

The Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies, a refereed academic journal produced
at the University of Iowa, is dedicated to publishing cultural studies work
from both established scholars and emerging critics. Our goal is to present
the best in contemporary criticism while fostering conversations across
disciplinary and ideological divides.

Please submit papers no later than JUNE 7, 2004 to:

Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies
English Department
308 English-Philosophy Building
University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA 52242-1492

Two hard copies of the manuscript and a disk, preferably in Microsoft Word
(for Windows), should be provided. Manuscripts cannot be returned unless a
self-addressed envelope with US postage is provided. Submissions should be
no longer than 30 pages and should be prepared following the MLA Style Manual.

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Received on Wed Apr 21 2004 - 00:40:46 EDT

cfp categories: 
journals_and_collections_of_essays