CFP: [Medieval] BEOWULF on Electronic Multimedia––Film/TV/Electronic Games/DVD (9/1/07; Kalamazoo 5/8–11/08)

full name / name of organization: 
Michael A Torregrossa
contact email: 
Popular.Culture.and.the.Middle.Ages@gmail.com

Will the "Reel" Beowulf Please Stand Up? Representations of the BEOWULF
Story on Electronic Multimedia

Sponsored by The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

Session to be held at the 43rd International Congress of Medieval
Studies, Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI), from 8-11 May
2008

Proposals due by 9/1/07

THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MIDDLE AGES
<http://PopularCultureandtheMiddleAges.org> invites proposals for
15-minute papers on any aspect of the medieval popular culture to be
included in a session to be held at the 43rd International Congress on
Medieval Studies, which convenes at Western Michigan University from
8-11 May 2008. In addition, submissions will also be considered for
inclusion in an essay collection on the topic of BEOWULF and the
Anglo-Saxon world on film.

Presentations included in "Will the "Reel" Beowulf Please Stand Up?
Representations of the BEOWULF Story on Electronic Multimedia," should
focus on how a seminal component of Medieval Studies research has been
adapted in select modern media. Rediscovered in the nineteenth
century, the Old English epic BEOWULF is an important text for
understanding our medieval forebears. It has also become significant
for its relationship to our post-medieval preoccupation with the
medieval. The story of Beowulf and his victories over the Grendel-kin
and the firedrake have been told and retold, over the past two hundred
years, in every known medium of our modern culture, a fact expertly
described by Marijane Osbourn and John William Sutton in their
respective bibliographies of Beowulfiana.

Beowulf is especially suited to visual media and has been adapted many
times to the electronic multimedia of film, videocassette, and video
game, with at least three filmed versions appearing in 2007. It has
even been retold in episodes of the popular television series XENA:
WARRIOR PRINCESS and STAR TREK: VOYAGER and in versions for young
audiences. However, despite the prevalence of film and televisual
representations of BEOWULF, there has been little academic interest in
this "reel" BEOWULF and no comprehensive discussion of the corpus.
Organized to bridge such divides between Medieval Studies and popular
culture, the Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle
Ages requests two sessions devoted to expanding knowledge about these
texts, works (like those discussed in our other sessions) that can be
used productively in teaching about the medieval poem and our modern
concerns about the story.

Please submit abstracts of 500 to 1000 words to the organizing
committee at the following address; please also submit a completed
abstract cover sheet (found at
<http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions.html>) with your
proposal.

Michael A. Torregrossa
34 2nd St
Smithfield, RI 02917-3627
Popular.Culture.and.the.Middle.Ages-at-gmail.com
http://PopularCultureandtheMiddleAges.org

--Michael A. Torregrossa, M.A.Co-Founder, The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ageshttp://PopularCultureandtheMiddleAges.org=================================== From the Literary Calls for Papers Mailing List cfp_at_english.upenn.edu more information at http://cfp.english.upenn.edu===================================Received on Thu Aug 02 2007 - 12:42:48 EDT

cfp categories: 
medieval