CFP: [Medieval] Traces of Recollection: Memory in Medieval Literary Texts (Kzoo 08; 9/1/07)

full name / name of organization: 
Kisha Tracy
contact email: 
kisha.tracy@uconn.edu

CFP: International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo 2008
Session Title: Traces of Recollection: Memory in Medieval Literary Texts
 
In the past, scholars have focused on the rhetorical implications of a
text or part of a text being made memorable by an author, on memory
practices, or on composition as an act of recollection – all of which are
useful paths of scholarship but which do not address the issue of the
representation of memory within literary texts. Scholarship in general
has focused on historical, philosophical, or theological works concerning
memory; these works are more direct in talking about memory because they
specifically discuss the nature of recollection rather than relying on
less direct methods as literary works do. There has been relatively
little done on the uses of recollection and memory theories as literary
devices or on how memory, through the depiction of characters undergoing
the process of recollection, affected literary images, representations,
themes, and structures. Sometimes, acts of recollection can be
pinpointed to one specific moment in the narrative; at other times, they
happen without the author deliberately drawing the reader’s attention to
them and may occur over a space of narrative time. Frequently,
recollection is preceded by its opposite, forgetfulness; in this type of
situation, forgetfulness is typically represented as a problem that an
individual must overcome. This panel seeks papers that will explicate
our understanding of memory and recollection in medieval literary texts.
 
Please send abstracts of up to 300 words by September 1, 2007, to Kisha
Tracy (University of Connecticut) at kisha.tracy_at_uconn.edu (or
aquitaine1980_at_yahoo.com).

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Received on Thu Aug 02 2007 - 17:37:14 EDT

cfp categories: 
medieval