CFP: [Medieval] Transforming Spaces: The Manipulation of Public and Private Spaces by Nineteenth-Century Women Write

full name / name of organization: 
Miranda Green-Barteet
contact email: 
mgreen-barteet@tamu.edu

Transforming Spaces: The Manipulation of Public and Private Spaces by
Nineteenth-Century Women Write

40th Anniversary Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
Feb. 26-March 1, 2009
Hyatt Regency - Boston, Massachusetts

In her ground breaking study Home Fronts: Domesticity and Its Critics in
the Antebellum United States, critic Lora Romero argues that
nineteenth-century theories of “female influence held that women ultimately
controlled society,” but such theories also “stressed that women exercised
power through indirect influence rather than direct force." By alleging
that women only influenced society obliquely, nineteenth century ideologies
of domesticity, such as those put forth by Catherine Beecher and Hannah
More, reiterated rather than questioned the division of spheres, a division
that critics know believe was more porous than once thought. Many women
writers, however, used domesticity as a means to describe, to question, and
to argue against their own second-class status and to claim control over
their own lives. Such writers manipulate public and private spaces into
sites of resistance, as they actively resist the limitations of domesticity
through their literary works. Through these manipulations, women writers
also revise the predominant precepts of domesticity and transform the
definitions of public and private spaces. This panel seeks to examine the
manipulation and resulting transformation of public and private spaces in
works written by nineteenth-century women.

Many nineteenth-century domestic theories contend that women controlled
society, but such theories also assert that women wielded power indirectly.
By alleging that women influenced society obliquely, domestic ideologies
reiterated rather than questioned the separate spheres. Many women
writers, however, used domesticity to question their own second-class
status. Such writers manipulate public and private spaces into sites of
resistance by resisting the limitations of domesticity. They also revise
domesticity and transform public and private spaces. This panel examines
the manipulation and transformation of public and private spaces in works
by nineteenth-century women.
Send abstracts to Miranda Green-Barteet, Texas A&M University:
mgreen-barteet_at_tamu.edu.

Deadline: September 15, 2008

Please include with your abstract:

Name and Affiliation
Email address
Postal address
Telephone number
A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee)

The complete Call for Papers for the 2009 Convention will be posted in
June: www.nemla.org.
Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA panel;
however panelists can only present one paper. Convention participants may
present a paper at a panel or seminar and also present at a creative
session or participate in a roundtable.

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Received on Sun May 18 2008 - 13:48:30 EDT

cfp categories: 
medieval