CFP: Literature of the Pacific (6/1/04; collection)

full name / name of organization: 
R. Weaver-Hightower
contact email: 
raweav1@yahoo.com

Call For Papers—Please Forward

We call for papers for a proposed edited
collection on the topics of literature and
authority—governmental, legal, rhetorical,
anthropological--in the Pacific, including
Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, the
Philippines, Malaysia, other Pacific Island
nations and Hawai’i. Successful essays will
address one or more Pacific writers and/or texts,
including both indigenous and "white" writers,
and will address either how the
interrelationships of politics and culture
affects writers, readers, and literature or how
literatures (traditional and non-traditional)
reflect themes of the relationship of history,
authority, and cultural self-expression.

Possible topics:
--literature as revisionist
historiography/anthropology
--colonialism, postcolonialism, or
neo-colonialism and as discussed in Pacific
literature
--laws (or governmental practice) about who can
write, about what is piracy or copyrighted,
criminality, social transgression, incarceration
and other related topics as related to national
identity and/or national literature
--governmental coups or instability as reflected
or discussed in literature
--politics of land rights and property, treaty,
mining, farming rights, and land use, both of
indigenous and non-indigenous people, as
reflected or discussed in literature
--ecological and environmental laws and issues as
reflected or discussed in literature
--women’s rights and family laws about domestic
violence, reproduction, marriage, and divorce as
reflected or discussed in literature
--welfare, worker’s rights, and social justice
legislation as reflected or discussed in
literature
--education as reflected or discussed in
literature
--medical practice, medicine, drug use, drinking
and public drunkenness laws as reflected or
discussed in literature
--law enforcement or the penal system as
reflected or discussed in literature
--questions of what is a crime and who are
criminals (outlaws) as reflected or discussed in
literature

Deadlines: Please submit 150-250 word abstracts
of original, unpublished work by June 1 to one of
the following addresses. By e-mail: Ned Watts:
wattse_at_msu.edu; Roger Bresnahan:
bresnaha_at_msu.edu; Rebecca Weaver-Hightower:
raweav1_at_yahoo.com. By mail: Roger Bresnahan,
Dept. of Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures,
235 Bessey Hall, Michigan State University, East
Lansing, MI 48824-1033.

The editors will respond to submissions by July
15 and will expect completed manuscripts by
December 15. The editors are interested in
essays that are theoretically mature yet highly
readable, that are grounded in readings of
literature in the service of cultural studies,
and that add to the growing interest in
literature of the Pacific and in intersections
between literature and legal issues.

=====
Dr. Rebecca Weaver-Hightower
Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures
Michigan State University

Book-reviews editor,
Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies
raweav1_at_yahoo.com
www.msu.edu/~weaverr

         ===============================================
         From the Literary Calls for Papers Mailing List
                      CFP_at_english.upenn.edu
                       Full Information at
                http://www.english.upenn.edu/CFP/
          or write Erika Lin: elin_at_english.upenn.edu
         ===============================================
Received on Thu Apr 08 2004 - 02:51:05 EDT

cfp categories: 
postcolonial