CFP: [Postcolonial] ACLA panel "Transnational Literary Movements and Material Culture" (11/1; 3/26-29)

full name / name of organization: 
Monica Cure / Oana Sabo
contact email: 
osabo@usc.edu

When thinking about transnational literary movements, it is easy to
overlook that literature never travels alone. Movements such as
transnational modernism(s), postcolonial literatures and studies, and the
Black Atlantic are made possible at different historical junctions by
political, economic, and technological changes. They are accompanied by
physical bodies and commodities and disseminated in a global environment
where certain cultures and languages have more currency than others. In
tracing the development of transnational literary movements, we ask what
are their relations to the material world — before, during, and after their
height? By placing literary movements and cultural artifacts in a
transnational framework, how can we eschew approaches that ascribe
materiality to the merely “local” and disembody some literature, especially
in its postcolonial or immigrant forms, to the realm of “the global”? What
are some ways in which certain writers’ literary identities function as
cultural commodities that ensure their texts’ circulation and consumption
by cosmopolitan audiences?

This panel welcomes papers on movements from a diversity of time periods,
ranging from early modern Europe’s discourse on the New World to
contemporary global migrant literature. Possible approaches include, but
are not limited to (post)colonial relations, the global literary market,
and inventions such as photography, the telephone, and art printing.

Please submit a 250-word proposal through the ACLA 2009 website BY
NOVEMBER 1, 2008: http://www.acla.org/acla2009/.

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Received on Thu Oct 09 2008 - 22:15:38 EDT

cfp categories: 
postcolonial