CFP: Contemporary Echoes of the Bible (3/15/06; collection)

full name / name of organization: 
Beth Benedix
contact email: 
bbenedix@depauw.edu

Revaluation, Subversion, Nostalgia: Contemporary Echoes of the Bible

This collection seeks to fill an interdisciplinary space that is=20
currently relatively empty. There are a number of collections that=20
deal with the =93Bible as literature,=94 collections on specific =
writers=92=20
use of the Bible, and collections that might be categorized as =93how-to=94=
=20
guides (i.e. how to teach the Bible as literature, how to think about=20
the Bible in literary terms, how to think about the use of the Bible in=20=

literature as a perpetuation of a particular=97often normative=97set of=20=

ideas). What we don=92t have many of are collections that address when,=20=

why, and how writers strategically reference the Bible for subversive=20
or re-evaluative purposes and that explore which specific biblical=20
pieces aid in this subversion/re-evaluation and why. When writers=20
invoke the Bible, do they do so in an attempt to reinstate a set of=20
beliefs that they feel have been forgotten or passed over? Or, are=20
they attempting to re-evaluate these teachings and their implications=20
for personal action and/or their societal repercussions? Or, and more=20=

likely, are they combining these impulses in some larger way? This=20
collection looks to address these sorts of questions.

Given the current political landscape=97where the Bible is drawn on=20
freely and unabashedly without critical reflection to legitimate and=20
justify all manner of agendas=97a collection that engages with the Bible=20=

in new, imaginative, and most importantly, critical ways could open up=20=

a space for dialogue about a set of issues that we can=92t afford to=20
ignore. An exploration of the political, social, philosophical and=20
ethical implications of the Bible from the perspective of thinkers who=20=

take nothing for granted might provide a direct route to understanding=20=

how an internally problematic and inconsistent narrative has come to=20
claim such a stronghold on the contemporary world.

Possible topics include:

--writing as =93Midrash=94

--unveiling, unmasking, exposing, redistributing or reassigning power

--tikkun, redemption, restoration

--uses, abuses and =93mis=94 uses of biblical text

--culture as expression, reflection, evaluation, critique,=20
manifestation, application of biblical text

--biblical text as space of encounter, dialogue, or meeting

--=93modern=94 vs. =93postmodern=94 gestures to the biblical text

--biblical text as impetus for =93new=94 theologies

--pedagogical approaches to any of the above topics

Please submit proposals of 500 words (max) and a brief C.V. including=20
contact information by March 15, 2006. Notification of acceptance will=20=

be May 1, 2006.

Send proposals (as Word attachments) and queries to Beth Hawkins=20
Benedix: bbenedix_at_depauw.edu.

Proposals may also be mailed to:

Beth Hawkins Benedix
Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Literature
Department of Religious Studies
DePauw University
214 Emison
Greencastle, IN 46135

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Received on Wed Sep 21 2005 - 11:41:12 EDT

cfp categories: 
bibliography_and_history_of_the_book