CFP: [Theory] Peer Reviewed Collection: Adaptation Theories

full name / name of organization: 
Jillian St Jacques
contact email: 
saintjacques@janvaneyck.nl

Proposals are sought for Adaptation Theories, a peer-reviewed collection to be published by the
Jan van Eyck Press. Art historians, literary scholars, cultural theorists and critics are invited to
submit abstracts for projects examining the idea of serial adaptations that traverse various
genres, theories and media. In light of Walter Benjamin’s trepidation regarding the notion of
“original” texts, how do we regard works that are adapted and readapted to the extent that they,
in some cases, contradict, refute, criticize, or even attack the original? And how can we analyze
serial adaptations in an interdisciplinary sense, while resisting the tendency to isolate singular
adaptations as maladapted, miscreant or deviant offspring? Articles might consider works of art,
such as adaptations of Leonardo’s Mona Lisa (Duchamp, Warhol, Morimura). Similarly, literature
moves through popular culture, as is the case with Polidori’s Vampyre, who has rippled across
multiple domains, from novels and films to breakfast cereal advertisements, amusement park
venues, and Neo-Goth lifestyles. Contributors might also explore the ways in which serial
adaptations recast the development of theory itself, as Oedipus moves from Sophocles to the
psychoanalytic takes of Freud and Lacan, to the radical horizontalism of Deleuze and Guattari in
Anti-Oedipus. Key questions might include: to what extent do adaptation and mimicry join
forces? How does adaptation relate to parody, and can the claim truly be made that adaptations
are different than related or contingent works? Can anything be said in favor of maladaptions,
and can a “bad adaption” be informative or productive? Abstracts of 300-400 words, along with
curriculum vitae, should be submitted as Word attachments to Jillian St. Jacques at
saintjacques_at_janvaneyck.nl by November 30. Notification of acceptance: December 10, 2007.
Deadline for papers: March 10, 2007. Word count is open, up to 8,000 words maximum.

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Received on Wed Oct 31 2007 - 19:23:50 EST

cfp categories: 
science_and_culture