UPDATE: "New Worlds, Lost Worlds": Discovery, Change, and Loss in Literature (grad) (11/15/06; 3/10/06-3/11/07)

full name / name of organization: 
Meredith Donaldson Clark
contact email: 
meredith.donaldson@mail.mcgill.ca

**Please note: the previously advertised conference is a graduate =
conference**

=93New Worlds, Lost Worlds=94: Discovery, Change, and Loss in Literature
McGill University, Montr=E9al
13th Annual Graduate Conference on Language and Literature
March 10-11, 2007

The English Graduate Students Association of McGill University is =
pleased to=20
announce its 13th annual Graduate Conference on Language and Literature, =
and=20
is seeking panel and paper proposals on the theme =93New Worlds, Lost =
Worlds=94:=20
Discovery, Change, and Loss in Literature. The conference will be held =
in=20
Montr=E9al, Canada on March 10th-11th, 2007.

Call for Panels and Papers

This conference will address how literature serves as a site for =
grappling=20
with monumental changes and upheavals of all kinds: in politics, =
religion,=20
human relationships, language, taste, literary trends, geography, =
science.=20
The theme =93New Worlds, Lost Worlds=94 is borrowed from the title of =
Susan=20
Brigden=92s work on Tudor history (London: Penguin, 2001). While she =
uses it=20
as a framework for understanding British history in the sixteenth =
century,=20
we encourage panels and papers to engage with this theme in its widest=20
application: how great changes cause loss as much as they introduce=20
innovation, and how literature is a record keeper, sometimes a fallible =
one,=20
of such transitions.

Some questions that can be explored are: How does narrative preserve =
memory=20
and the past? What effects have revisionist histories had on our =
reading of=20
literature? What strategies do postcolonial approaches to literature use =
to=20
recover what has been lost? How does literature not only reflect =
change,=20
but also resist or encourage change?

Possible panel and paper topics include:
-travel narratives
-literature as history; history as literature
-the evolution or representation of a displaced culture
-representations of utopias and dystopias
-translation of texts
-representations of change on the page vs. the stage
-literature and (scientific) revolution
-recovery of lost voices
-postcolonial approaches to literary studies
-artistic repercussions produced by a political event
-how children=92s literature helps young readers cope with change
-the history of the book (changes in the material production and =
circulation=20
of literature)

Please send panel proposals (300 words) or completed panel descriptions =
(300=20
words per paper) by November 15, 2006. Approved panels will then be =
posted=20
on the UPenn site by the end of November. Paper proposals (300 words) =
which=20
answer this general call, or which answer specific panels are due =
January 5,=20
2007.

To submit proposals or for more information, please contact Meredith=20
Donaldson Clark (meredith.donaldson (at) mail.mcgill.ca) or Amanda =
Cockburn=20
(amanda.cockburn (at) mail.mcgill.ca)=20

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Received on Fri Nov 10 2006 - 18:15:42 EST

cfp categories: 
childrens_literature