CFP: Mythopoeic Fantasy Landscape [& Inklings] (4/15/06; 8/4/06-8/7/06)

full name / name of organization: 
Edith.Crowe_at_sjsu.edu
contact email: 
Edith.Crowe@sjsu.edu

Call for Papers: Mythopoeic Society Conference XXXVII
University of Oklahoma, Norman OK
4-7 August 2006
http://www.mythsoc.org/mythcon37.html

The Map and the Territory: Maps and Landscapes in Fantasy

(with a track on Native American Fantasy/Native Americans in Fantasy)

Author Guest of Honor: Lois McMaster Bujold
Scholar Guest of Honor: Amy Sturgis

What role do maps and landscapes play in fantasy? Is drawing the map=20
necessarily an early part of the subcreative process? How do fantasists go =

about creating the worlds in which their stories take place? Sometimes=20
it's said that the landscape is a character in the story?what does this=20
mean? Sometimes maps play an important role in the story itself. Maps also =

provide an opportunity for "other minds and hands" to fill in the blanks=20
left in an author's subcreated world. Native American characters=20
frequently appear in fantastic fiction?how are they portrayed, and what=20
role(s) do they play? Consider fantasies based on native myths and legends =

and/or fantasy written by Native American authors?what sources and=20
philosophies do they bring to the field of fantasy?

Papers dealing with these conference themes are especially encouraged. We=20
also welcome papers focusing on the work and interests of the Inklings=20
(especially J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and Charles Williams), of our=20
Guests of Honor, and other fantasy authors and themes. Papers from a=20
variety of critical perspectives and disciplines are welcome.=20

Each paper will be given a one-hour slot to allow time for questions, but=20
individual papers should be timed for oral presentation in 40 minutes=20
maximum. Two presenters who wish to present short, related papers may also =

share a one-hour slot. Participants are encouraged to submit papers chosen =

for presentation at the conference to Mythlore, the refereed journal of=20
the Mythopoeic Society (http://www.mythsoc.org/mythlore.html). All papers=20
should conform to the MLA Style Manual (2nd ed). Paper abstracts (250 word =

maximum), along with contact information, should be sent to the Papers=20
Coordinator at the following address (e-mail is preferable) by 15 April,=20
2006. Please include your AV requests and the projected time needed for=20
your presentation.

Edith L. Crowe=20
Reference & Academic Services
San Jose State University Library=20
San Jose CA 95192-0028
edith.crowe_at_sjsu.edu

The Mythopoeic Society is an international literary and educational=20
organization devoted to the study, discussion, and enjoyment of the works=20
of J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and mythopoeic=20
literature. We believe the study of these writers can lead to greater=20
understanding and appreciation of the literary, philosophical, and=20
spiritual traditions which underlie their works, and can engender an=20
interest in the study of myth, legend, and the genre of fantasy. Find out=20
about past conferences at http://www.mythsoc.org/conferences.html.

Edith L. Crowe | (408) 808-2037 | edith.crowe_at_sjsu.edu
Art & Humanities Librarian & Coordinator of Graduate Instruction
San Jose State University Library (http://www.sjlibrary.org)

Corresponding Secretary of the Mythopoeic Society (http://www.mythsoc.org)

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Received on Tue Dec 13 2005 - 08:39:00 EST

cfp categories: 
twentieth_century_and_beyond